Wrinkles

  • Medical Author:
    Gary W. Cole, MD, FAAD

    Dr. Cole is board certified in dermatology. He obtained his BA degree in bacteriology, his MA degree in microbiology, and his MD at the University of California, Los Angeles. He trained in dermatology at the University of Oregon, where he completed his residency.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Anti-Aging Skincare Essentials

Quick GuideHow to Reduce Wrinkles With Lifestyle Changes

How to Reduce Wrinkles With Lifestyle Changes

What factors promote wrinkles?

Factors that promote wrinkling include the following:

  • Smoking
  • Degree of natural skin pigmentation (more is better)
  • Sun and ultraviolet exposure
  • Heredity (some families wrinkle more)
  • The loss of subcutaneous fat on a person's body (people with more subcutaneous fat have fewer wrinkles)

Some of these factors are beyond our control. The main preventive measures we can take are to minimize sun exposure and not smoke. These measures can, at best, delay wrinkles.

SPF numbers on sunscreen labels refer to protection against UVB radiation (the "sunburn rays"). Higher SPF numbers (50) are better at protecting the skin than lower numbers. Broad-spectrum sunscreens offer protection against UVB and UVA radiation (longer-wave ultraviolet light). UVA rays are abundant in sunlight and are produced by tanning salon light bulbs; they may not cause immediate sunburn but do produce aging and an increase skin cancer risk over time. (Sorry, but there is no such thing as a "safe tan.") Sunscreens that block UVA indicate this on the label and contain ingredients such as Parsol, Mexoryl, and benzophenones.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/13/2015

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