Vitamin K

How does Vitamin K work?

Vitamin K is an essential vitamin that is needed by the body for blood clotting and other important processes.

Are there safety concerns?

The two forms of vitamin K (vitamin K1 and vitamin K2) are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth or injected into the vein appropriately. Most people do not experience any side effects when taking in the recommended amount each day.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: When taken in the recommended amount each day, vitamin K is considered safe for pregnant and breast-feeding women. Don't use higher amounts without the advice of your healthcare professional.

Children: The form of vitamin K known as vitamin K1 is LIKELY SAFE for children when taken by mouth or injected into the body appropriately.

Diabetes: The form of vitamin K known as vitamin K1 might lower blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes and take vitamin K1, monitor your blood sugar levels closely.

Kidney disease: Too much vitamin K can be harmful if you are receiving dialysis treatments due to kidney disease.

Liver disease: Vitamin K is not effective for treating clotting problems caused by severe liver disease. In fact, high doses of vitamin K can make clotting problems worse in these people.

Reduced bile secretion: People with decreased bile secretion who are taking vitamin K might need to take supplemental bile salts along with vitamin K to ensure vitamin K absorption.


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