Vaginitis

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

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What are the risk factors for vaginitis?

The risk factors for vaginitis depend upon the type of vaginitis.

Risk factors for STDs include multiple sexual partners and unprotected intercourse.

Some of the known risk factors for bacterial vaginosis include cigarette smoking, multiple sex partners, douching, and using IUDs for contraception.

Risk factors for yeast infection are varied. They can include suppression of the immune system either due to cancer or other conditions, or by taking immune-suppressing medications. Antibiotic use is another known risk factor. Pregnancy, diabetes, taking oral contraceptives, and douching can all increase a woman's likelihood of developing yeast vaginitis.

What are the symptoms of vaginitis?

Vaginitis causes irritation of the vagina that can result in burning, itching, or pain. Vaginal discharge is another common symptom of vaginitis. Other common symptoms include pain during sexual intercourse or urination and a vaginal odor.

It is also possible to have vaginitis or an STD without experiencing any symptoms.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/20/2015
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