Benign Uterine Growths (Growths of the Womb)

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideUterine Fibroid Pictures: Anatomy Diagrams, Pictures of Fibroids, Tests, Treatments, and More

Uterine Fibroid Pictures: Anatomy Diagrams, Pictures of Fibroids, Tests, Treatments, and More

What are uterine polyps?

Polyps of the uterus are benign overgrowths, or bulges, of the normal tissue lining the uterus into the uterine cavity. Polyps may also be found in the uterine cervix. Polyps are usually attached to the underlying tissue by a base or stalk, and they vary in size. Polyps only rarely contain cancerous cells. They are most common in women in their 40's and are rare in women under 20 years of age.

What are the symptoms of uterine polyps and what do they look like?

Uterine polyps may not produce any symptoms. However, some women may experience:

Picture of Uterine Polyps
Picture of Uterine Polyps

How are uterine polyps diagnosed and treated?

Sometimes, the polyps stick out through the opening of the cervix so that they are visible during a speculum exam, such as during a Pap smear. Diagnosis is by ultrasound or examination under a microscope of the tissue removed during uterine sampling. A diagnosis can also be made by hysteroscopy, the insertion of a scope that allows visualization of the uterine cavity from the inside. It is often possible to remove polyps during this procedure. Curettage, a procedure in which the lining of the uterus is removed, can be used to cure endometrial polyps in most cases.

REFERENCES:

"Uterine Fibroid Embolization and Imaging." Medscape Reference

"Medical Treatment of Uterine Fibroids." Medscape Reference.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/28/2016

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