Uterine Fibroids (Benign Tumors Of The Uterus)

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Uterine Fibroids Slideshow

Quick GuideWomen's Health: A Visual Guide to Uterine Fibroids

Women's Health: A Visual Guide to Uterine Fibroids

What are the usual ways of diagnosing uterine fibroids?

Uterine fibroids are diagnosed by pelvic exam and even more commonly by ultrasound. Often, a pelvic mass cannot be determined to be a fibroid on pelvic exam alone, and ultrasound is very helpful in differentiating it from other conditions such as ovarian tumors. MRI and CT scans can also play a role in diagnosing fibroids, but ultrasound is the simplest, cheapest, and best technique for imaging the pelvis. Occasionally, when trying to determine if a fibroid is present in the uterine cavity (endometrial cavity), a hysterosonogram (HSG) is done. In this procedure, an ultrasound exam is done while contrast fluid is injected into the uterus through the cervix. The fluid within the endometrial cavity can help outline any masses that are inside, such as submucosal fibroids.

What is the treatment for uterine fibroids?

There are several options for the treatment of uterine fibroids that include surgery (hysterectomy, myomectomy, cryosurgery, MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), and uterine artery embolization (UAE). Medical treatments include medications such as mifepristone (RU-486, danazol (Danocrine), raloxifene (Evista), GnRH analogs (Lupron and others), and low-dose formulations of oral contraceptives.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/5/2015

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