Uterine Fibroids (Benign Tumors Of The Uterus)

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Uterine Fibroids Slideshow

Uterine fibroids facts

  • Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that originate in the uterus (womb).
  • It is not known exactly why women develop uterine fibroids.
  • Most women with uterine fibroids have no symptoms. However, fibroids can cause a number of symptoms depending on their size, location within the uterus, and how close they are to adjacent pelvic organs. These are most commonly abnormal bleeding, pain and pressure.
  • Uterine fibroids are diagnosed by pelvic exam and by ultrasound.
  • If treatment for uterine fibroids is required, both surgical and medical treatment options are available.

What are uterine fibroids?

Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that originate in the uterus (womb). Although they are composed of the same smooth muscle fibers as the uterine wall (myometrium), they are much denser than normal myometrium. Uterine fibroids are usually round.

Uterine fibroids are often described based upon their location within the uterus. Subserosal fibroids are located beneath the serosa (the lining membrane on the outside of the uterus). These often appear localized on the outside surface of the uterus or may be attached to the outside surface by a pedicle. Submucosal (submucous) fibroids are located inside the uterine cavity beneath the inner lining of the uterus. Intramural fibroids are located within the muscular wall of the uterus.

Picture of uterine fibroids
Picture of uterine fibroids

Quick GuideUterine Fibroid Pictures: Anatomy Diagrams, Pictures of Fibroids, Tests, Treatments, and More

Uterine Fibroid Pictures: Anatomy Diagrams, Pictures of Fibroids, Tests, Treatments, and More
Uterine fibroids picture

Uterine Fibroids Trreatment

Why is a hysterectomy performed?

The most common reason hysterectomy is performed is for uterine fibroids. Other common reasons are:

  • abnormal uterine bleeding (vaginal bleeding),
  • cervical dysplasia (pre-cancerous conditions of the cervix),
  • endometriosis, and uterine prolapse (including pelvic relaxation).
Picture of Uterine Fibroids

What causes uterine fibroids and how common are they?

We do not know exactly why women develop these tumors. Genetic abnormalities, alterations in growth factor (proteins formed in the body that direct the rate and extent of cell proliferation) expression, abnormalities in the vascular (blood vessel) system, and tissue response to injury have all been suggested to play a role in the development of fibroids.

Family history is a key factor, since there is often a history of fibroids developing in women of the same family. Race also appears to play a role. Women of African descent are two to three times more likely to develop fibroids than women of other races. Women of African ancestry also develop fibroids at a younger age and may have symptoms from fibroids in their 20s, in contrast to Caucasian women with fibroids, in whom symptoms typically occur during the 30s and 40s. Early pregnancy decreases the likelihood that fibroids will develop. Fibroids have not been observed in girls who have not reached puberty, but adolescent girls may rarely develop fibroids. Other factors that researchers have associated with an increased risk of developing fibroids include having the first menstrual period (menarche) prior to age 10, consumption of alcohol (particularly beer), uterine infections, and elevated blood pressure (hypertension).

Estrogen tends to stimulate the growth of fibroids in many cases. During the first trimester of pregnancy, about a third of fibroids will enlarge and then shrink after the birth. In general, fibroids tend to shrink after menopause, but postmenopausal hormone therapy may cause symptoms to persist.

Overall, these tumors are fairly common and occur in about 70% to 80% of all women by the time they reach age 50. Most of the time, uterine fibroids do not cause symptoms or problems, and a woman with a fibroid is usually unaware of its presence.

What are the symptomsof uterine fibroids?

Most women with uterine fibroids have no symptoms.

However, abnormal uterine bleeding is the most common symptom of a fibroid. If the tumors are near the uterine lining, or interfere with the blood flow to the lining, they can cause heavy periods, painful periods, prolonged periods or spotting between menses. Women with excessive bleeding due to fibroids may develop iron deficiency anemia. Uterine fibroids that are degenerating can sometimes cause severe, localized pain.

Fibroids can also cause a number of symptoms depending on their size, location within the uterus, and how close they are to adjacent pelvic organs. Large fibroids can cause:

  • pressure,
  • pelvic pain,
  • pressure on the bladder with frequent or even obstructed urination, and
  • pressure on the rectum with painful or difficult defecation.

While fibroids do not interfere with ovulation, some studies suggest that they may impair fertility and lead to poorer pregnancy outcomes. In particular, submucosal fibroids that deform the inner uterine cavity are most strongly associated with decreases in fertility. Occasionally, fibroids are the cause of recurrent miscarriages. If they are not removed in these cases, the woman may not be able to sustain a pregnancy.

Do untreated uterine fibroids pose a risk?

For the most part, uterine fibroids that do not cause a problem for the woman can be left untreated. In some cases, even fibroids that are not causing symptoms require removal or at least close observation. Rapid growth is a reason to watch more carefully, since a rare cancerous form of fibroid (referred to as a leiomyosarcoma) can be a fast-growing tumor, and it cannot be differentiated from a benign fibroid by ultrasound, MRI , or other imaging studies. However, this type of tumor occurs in less than 1% of uterine fibroids.

Another risk of leaving these tumors alone is that they sometimes grow to a size that eventually cause significant symptoms, thus requiring removal. If fibroids grow large enough, the surgery to remove them can become more difficult and risky.

Quick GuideUterine Fibroid Pictures: Anatomy Diagrams, Pictures of Fibroids, Tests, Treatments, and More

Uterine Fibroid Pictures: Anatomy Diagrams, Pictures of Fibroids, Tests, Treatments, and More

What are the usual ways of diagnosing uterine fibroids?

Uterine fibroids are diagnosed by pelvic exam and even more commonly by ultrasound. Often, a pelvic mass cannot be determined to be a fibroid on pelvic exam alone, and ultrasound is very helpful in differentiating it from other conditions such as ovarian tumors. MRI and CT scans can also play a role in diagnosing fibroids, but ultrasound is the simplest, cheapest, and best technique for imaging the pelvis. Occasionally, when trying to determine if a fibroid is present in the uterine cavity (endometrial cavity), a hysterosonogram (HSG) is done. In this procedure, an ultrasound exam is done while contrast fluid is injected into the uterus through the cervix. The fluid within the endometrial cavity can help outline any masses that are inside, such as submucosal fibroids.

What is the treatment for uterine fibroids?

There are several options for the treatment of uterine fibroids that include surgery (hysterectomy, myomectomy, cryosurgery, MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), and uterine artery embolization (UAE). Medical treatments include medications such as mifepristone (RU-486, danazol (Danocrine), raloxifene (Evista), GnRH analogs (Lupron and others), and low-dose formulations of oral contraceptives.

Surgery for fibroids

There are many ways of managing uterine fibroids. Surgical methods are the mainstay of treatment when treatment is necessary. Possible surgical interventions include hysterectomy, or removal of the uterus (and the fibroids with it). Myomectomy is the selective removal of just the fibroids within the uterus. Myomectomy can be done through a hysteroscope, laparoscope or with the standard open incision on the abdominal wall. Some treatments have involved boring holes into the fibroid with laser fibers, freezing probes (cryosurgery), and other destructive techniques that do not actually remove the tissue but try to destroy it in place. Surgery is necessary if there is suspicion of malignancy in any case of a leiomyoma or uterine mass.

Another technique for treating fibroids is known as uterine artery embolization (UAE). This technique uses small beads of a compound called polyvinyl alcohol, which are injected through a catheter into the arteries that feed the fibroid. These beads obstruct the blood supply to the fibroid and starve it of blood and oxygen. While this technique has not been in use long enough to evaluate long-term effects of UAE versus surgery, it is known that women undergoing UAE for fibroids have a shorter hospital stay than those having surgery but a greater risk of complications and readmissions to the hospital. Studies are underway to evaluate the long-term outcomes of UAE as opposed to surgical treatment. Uterine artery occlusion (UAO), which involves clamping the involved uterine arteries as opposed to injecting the polyvinyl alcohol beads, is currently under investigation as a potential alternative to UAE.

Quick GuideUterine Fibroid Pictures: Anatomy Diagrams, Pictures of Fibroids, Tests, Treatments, and More

Uterine Fibroid Pictures: Anatomy Diagrams, Pictures of Fibroids, Tests, Treatments, and More

Medical treatment for fibroids

Non-surgical techniques are usually hormonal in nature and include the use of drugs that turn off the production of estrogen from the ovaries (GnRH analogs). These medications are given for three to six months and induce a hypoestrogenic (low estrogen) state. When successful, they can shrink the fibroids by as much as 50%. Side effects of these drugs are similar to the symptoms of menopause and can include hot flashes, sleep disturbance, vaginal dryness, and mood changes. Bone loss leading to osteoporosis after long-term (6 to 12+ months) use is one complication. This is generally reversed after the treatment ends. These drugs may also be used as preoperative treatment for large leiomyoma to shrink them in order to make the operation less difficult and reduce surgical risk.

Mifepristone (RU-486) is an antiprogestin drug that can shrink fibroids to an extent comparable to treatment with the GnRH analogs. This drug is also used to terminate early pregnancy. Treatment with mifepristone also reduced the bleeding associated with fibroids, but this treatment can be associated with adverse side effects such as overgrowth (hyperplasia) of the endometrium (uterine lining). Mifepristone is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of uterine leiomyomas, and the required dosages (different from those used for termination of early pregnancy) have not been determined.

Danazol (Danocrine) is an androgenic steroid hormone that has been used to reduce bleeding in women with fibroids, since this drug causes menstruation to cease. However, danazol does not appear to shrink the size of fibroids. Danazol is also associated with significant side effects, including weight gain, muscle cramps, decreased breast size, acne, hirsutism (inappropriate hair growth), oily skin, mood changes, depression, decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL or 'good cholesterol') levels, and increased liver enzyme levels.

The administration of raloxifene (Evista), a drug used to prevent and treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, has been shown to decrease the size of fibroids in postmenopausal women, but results with this therapy in premenopausal women have been conflicting.

Low dose formulations of oral contraceptives are also sometimes given to treat the abnormal bleeding associated with fibroids, but these do not shrink the fibroids themselves.

What are the risks of uterine fibroids during pregnancy?

Some studies have shown an increased risk of pregnancy complications in the presence of fibroids, such as first trimester bleeding, breech presentation, placental abruption, and problems during labor. Fibroids have also been associated with an increased risk of cesarean delivery. The size of the fibroid and its precise location within the uterus are important factors in determining whether a fibroid causes obstetric complications.

Medically reviewed by Steven Nelson, MD; Board Certified Obstetrics and Gynecology

REFERENCES:

eMedicine.com. Leiomyoma, uterus.
<http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/405676-overview>

Parker, WH. Uterine myomas: management. Fertil Steril. 2007 Aug;88(2):255-71. Epub 2007 Jul 20.

Previous contributing medical author: Leon Baginski, MD, FACOG

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Reviewed on 5/5/2015
References
Medically reviewed by Steven Nelson, MD; Board Certified Obstetrics and Gynecology

REFERENCES:

eMedicine.com. Leiomyoma, uterus.
<http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/405676-overview>

Parker, WH. Uterine myomas: management. Fertil Steril. 2007 Aug;88(2):255-71. Epub 2007 Jul 20.

Previous contributing medical author: Leon Baginski, MD, FACOG

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