Urinary Incontinence in Women (cont.)

How is incontinence evaluated?

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The first step toward relief is to see a doctor who has experience treating incontinence to learn what type you have. A urologist specializes in the urinary tract, and some urologists further specialize in the female urinary tract. Gynecologists and obstetricians specialize in the female reproductive tract and childbirth. A urogynecologist focuses on urinary and associated pelvic problems in women. Family practitioners and internists see patients for all kinds of health conditions. Any of these doctors may be able to help you. In addition, some nurses and other health care providers often provide rehabilitation services and teach behavioral therapies such as fluid management and pelvic floor strengthening.

To diagnose the problem, your doctor will first ask about symptoms and medical history. Your pattern of voiding and urine leakage may suggest the type of incontinence you have. Thus, many specialists begin with having you fill out a bladder diary over several days. These diaries can reveal obvious factors that can help define the problem-including straining and discomfort, fluid intake, use of drugs, recent surgery, and illness. Often you can begin treatment at the first medical visit.

Your doctor may instruct you to keep a diary for a day or more-sometimes up to a week-to record when you void. This diary should note the times you urinate and the amounts of urine you produce. To measure your urine, you can use a special pan that fits over the toilet rim. You can also use the bladder diary to record your fluid intake, episodes of urine leakage, and estimated amounts of leakage.

If your diary and medical history do not define the problem, they will at least suggest which tests you need.

Your doctor will physically examine you for signs of medical conditions causing incontinence, including treatable blockages from bowel or pelvic growths. In addition, weakness of the pelvic floor leading to incontinence may cause a condition called prolapse, where the vagina or bladder begins to protrude out of your body. This condition is also important to diagnose at the time of an evaluation.

Your doctor may measure your bladder capacity. The doctor may also measure the residual urine for evidence of poorly functioning bladder muscles. To do this, you will urinate into a measuring pan, after which the nurse or doctor will measure any urine remaining in the bladder. Your doctor may also recommend other tests:

  • Bladder stress test -- You cough vigorously as the doctor watches for loss of urine from the urinary opening.
  • Urinalysis and urine culture -- Laboratory technicians test your urine for evidence of infection, urinary stones, or other contributing causes.
  • Ultrasound -- This test uses sound waves to create an image of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra.
  • Cystoscopy -- The doctor inserts a thin tube with a tiny camera in the urethra to see inside the urethra and bladder.
  • Urodynamics -- Various techniques measure pressure in the bladder and the flow of urine.

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Urinary Incontinence in Women - Experience Question: Please describe your experience with urinary incontinence.
Urinary Incontinence in Women - Treatment Question: What was the treatment for your incontinence?
Urinary Incontinence in Women - When it Happens Question: For some, it's coughing or laughing. What activity triggers urinary incontinence for you?
Urinary Incontinence in Women - Evaluation Question: Please describe the tests and exams you experienced during your evaluation for urinary incontinence.

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