triamterene and hydrochlorothiazide

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

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Combining hydrochlorothiazide with corticosteroids may increase the risk for low levels of blood potassium and other electrolytes. Low blood potassium can increase the toxicity of digoxin (Lanoxin).

Cholestyramine (Questran, Questran Light) and colestipol (Colestid) bind to hydrochlorothiazide and reduce its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract by 43%-85%.

Blood sugar levels can be elevated by hydrochlorothiazide necessitating adjustment in the doses of medications that are used for treating diabetes.

PREGNANCY: Triamterene/hydrochlorothiazide has not been adequately studied in pregnant women.

NURSING MOTHERS:  Triamterene/hydrochlorothiazide has not been evaluated in nursing mothers. Hydrochlorothiazide is excreted in breast milk. Intense diuresis using hydrochlorothiazide may reduce the production of breast milk. Otherwise, hydrochlorothiazide is considered safe to use during nursing if required by the mother.

SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of triamterene/hydrochlorothiazide include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, rash, headache, dizziness, constipation, low blood pressure, electrolyte disturbance (for example, high potassium levels), muscle cramps, hypersensitivity, pancreatitis, and jaundice. Triamterene/hydrochlorothiazide may increase blood sugar (glucose) levels and precipitate or worsen diabetes. Patients allergic to sulfa drugs may also be allergic to hydrochlorothiazide because of the similarity in the chemical structure of the two drugs.

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/29/2014

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