triamcinolone acetonide nasal inhaler-spray, Nasacort (discontinued brand in USA); Nasacort AQ

  • Medical Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

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DRUG INTERACTIONS: No drug interactions have been described with nasal triamcinolone.

PREGNANCY: Serious complications (including cleft palate and still births) have been reported when oral corticosteroids were administered during pregnancy. It is not known if the small amounts of corticosteroids that appear in the blood following intranasal use carry the same risk. Triamcinolone acetonide use during pregnancy should be avoided unless the physician feels that the potential therapeutic benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

NURSING MOTHERS: It is unknown whether triamcinolone acetonide accumulates in breast milk. However, it is known that other corticosteroids are excreted in breast milk. The effects on the child, if any, are unknown.

SIDE EFFECTS: The most common side effects following nasal inhalation of triamcinolone acetonide are nasal irritation and itching, increased cough, nausea or vomiting, sore throat, nasal congestion, sneezing, nasal burning, bloody nasal discharge, and nasal dryness. Other adverse effects reported with intranasal triamcinolone acetonide include headache, dizziness, and watery eyes. All of these are either mild or uncommon. Nasal septal perforation, oral or nasal fungal infections, growth suppression in children, glaucoma, cataracts, and decreased production of cortisol by the adrenal glands also may occur.

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

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