Travel Health

Don't let your trip derail your diet and exercise plans

By Shannon James
WebMD Weight Loss Clinic - Feature

Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Whether you're headed home for the holidays, taking off on a long-planned vacation, or traveling for business, being on the road can wreak havoc with the best-laid eating and exercise plans. Is it possible to stick to your diet and fitness program -- or at least avoid gaining weight -- while you travel? Experts say the answer is yes, but your chances for maintaining good health while you travel will improve with a little advance planning.

Fern Reis, chief executive officer of the branding company Expertizing.com, has developed a system for eating healthy when on the road. She travels with Ziploc bags of raw vegetables, dried fruit, nuts, crackers, and a jar of peanut butter.

"Not only does this keep me on my diet, but it also protects me from starvation (or more likely, overeating) when delays occur on airplanes," says Reis. "It's not that difficult to stick to your diet when you're in a restaurant at a time when you're supposed to be eating; it's those, 'Oh, my God, it's 3 p.m. and I'm starving because I'm still on this airplane! that kill you."

Kathy McCabe, editor and publisher of the travel newsletter Dream of Italy, has developed her own tricks for sticking to her diet in what she calls "the land of carbs."

"It's hard to fight off packing on the pounds in Italy," says McCabe. Following the Italian way of living -- no snacking and lots of walking -- helps, but McCabe has also taken to bringing a box or two of bran bars with her.

"They have lots of nutrients and fiber, so I'll have one with my morning coffee instead of having a roll or pastry as the Italians do, or I'll have one as a snack," she says.

Pack Your Snacks

Reis and McCabe have the right idea, say nutrition experts.

"You never know when there will be long delays when you're traveling -- especially around the holidays -- so if you plan ahead, you won't be stuck going to the first fast-food place you find," says Samantha Heller, MS, RD, senior clinical nutritionist at New York University Medical Center.

Some portable snack options include:

  • Raw nuts (but keep the portions to about 1/4 cup) and soy nuts
  • Fresh or dried fruit
  • Bagels
  • Pretzels
  • Low-sugar granola bars
  • Low-fat energy bars
  • Mini carrots
  • Bottled water

Wellness coach Larina Kase, PsyD, MBA, has a few other tips for "traveling lean":

  • Don't leave hungry, or you'll be much more likely to make poor food choices. "Start off your trip on the right foot with a healthy meal before you leave," says Kase.
  • When you reach your destination, look for healthy food options in or near your hotel. When you're pressed for time, you'll be less likely to run to the closest fast-food restaurant if you know there's a cafe with healthy salads and sandwiches right around the corner.
  • Don't think of traveling as a break from your regular life and healthy eating habits. "Calories count whether they are consumed in the air, on the road, or in a hotel," Kase says.
  • Cut calories wherever you can. Avoid sauces, or at least ask for them on the side. Just ordering a sandwich without mayonnaise, for example, can save you 30 grams of fat.

Fitness expert Debbie Mandel, author of Turn on Your Inner Light: Fitness for Body, Mind and Soul, suggests filling up on fresh fruits and vegetables at local markets when you travel. Not only may you discover foods that you can't find at home, you'll reap the benefits of the fiber found in fresh produce.

Drinking plenty of bottled water will also help fill you up and keep you from feeling fatigued, says Mandel.

And don't forget to exercise, she adds.

"Speed up your metabolism," she advises. Walk, jump rope, use water bottles as weights, or do push-ups and sit-ups. ... These are all exercises you can do wherever you go."



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