tramadol, Ultram, Ultram ER, Conzip (cont.)

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Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

The recommended dose for extended release tablets is 100 mg daily which may be increased by 100 mg every 5 days but not to exceed 300 mg /day. To convert from immediate release to extended release, the total daily dose should be rounded down to the nearest 100 mg. Extended release tablets should be swallowed whole and not crushed or chewed.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Carbamazepine (Tegretol, Tegretol XR , Equetro, Carbatrol) reduces the effect of tramadol by increasing its inactivation in the body. Quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinidex) reduces the inactivation of tramadol, thereby increasing the concentration of tramadol by 50% to 60%. Combining tramadol with monoamine oxidase inhibitors or MAOIs (for example, tranylcypromine [Parnate]) or selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs), for example, fluoxetine (Prozac), may result in severe side effects such as seizures or a condition called serotonin syndrome.

Tramadol may increase central nervous system and respiratory depression when combined with alcohol, anesthetics, narcotics, tranquilizers or sedative hypnotics. This can reduce the level of consciousness or lead to respiratory insufficiency.

PREGNANCY: The safety of tramadol during pregnancy has not been established.

NURSING MOTHERS: The safety of tramadol in nursing mothers has not been established.

SIDE EFFECTS: Tramadol is generally well tolerated, and side effects are usually transient. Commonly reported side effects include nausea, constipation, dizziness, headache, drowsiness, and vomiting. Less commonly reported side effects include itching, sweating, dry mouth, diarrhea, rash, visual disturbances, and vertigo. Some patients who received tramadol have reported seizures.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/29/2014


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