Toxoplasmosis (Toxo)

  • Medical Author:
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

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What is the prognosis for toxoplasmosis?

The majority of people who get toxoplasmosis will have no significant long-term effects.

An infected fetus or infant has a variable prognosis, depending on the severity of the effects of the disease. The earlier the fetus is infected, the worse the prognosis. A woman carrying a severely affected fetus may experience a spontaneous abortion (miscarriage), and newborns may develop significant physical or mental problems.

Patients with compromised immune systems have a variable prognosis, depending on their response to treatment. Patients with HIV or long-term immune compromised states will need to continue treatment for life.

Medically reviewed by Robert Cox, MD; American Board of Internal Medicine with subspecialty in Infectious Disease

REFERENCES:

Davis, Charles. "Toxoplasmosis." eMedicineHealth.com. Oct. 6, 2009. <http://www.emedicinehealth.com/
toxoplasmosis/article_em.htm>.

"Toxoplasmosis." Organization of Teratology Infomration Specialists. <http://www.otispregnancy.org/otis-fact-sheets-p135727>.

"Toxoplasmosis in Cats." Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. Apr. 8, 2008. <http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/brochures/toxo.html>.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 11/11/2015

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