Patient Comments: Total Hip Replacement - Candidate and Causes

What caused you to need a total hip replacement?

Comment from: Wantmylifeback, (Patient) Published: October 07

I'm 35 years old I have avascular necrosis in both hips. I need a bilateral hip replacement. I'm ready for my life back.

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Comment from: MJ, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: September 21

At age 65 I was diagnosed with avascular necrosis. I did not even know what this was. My pain was in the groin and hip bone area. I was fortunate to be able to have the surgery for total hip replacement within 2 1/2 weeks after diagnosis. I did great after surgery for about 3 weeks, then got an infection in the skin that caused me to need more rest and less exercise. That was a setback for me. Since then, I have not been pain free. I have a big goal to go with my granddaughter on a make-a-wish trip to Disney World in one week, 11 weeks after surgery. I am still having some pain but having therapy 3 times/week and improving very slowly. I am disappointed in still having pain. I am thinking positive and being careful, plus many wishes from friends and family will help I'm sure.

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Comment from: Liz, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: June 18

I had full hip replacement five and a half weeks ago. I fell while curling (this is the ice game that has people sweeping in front of rocks on the ice). I did not know I broke my hip at first and moved around in horrible pain for a week until I was admitted to emergency. I had one hanging leg! After the emergency surgery not having pain was a relief, I started walking with a walker and did physiotherapy (PT) in payment and now do outpatient PT. I am hoping after my x-ray tomorrow, the doctor will give me clearance to start bending! I have no pain, just the jab if I twist too quickly. The PT has helped so much. I can walk three miles with and without the walker. Looking forward to driving myself this week at last. I attribute my wellbeing to the skill of the surgeon, and following PT religiously.

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Comment from: Susan Hale, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: February 13

My favorite form of exercise involved a lot of hip and knee bending. My left hip to ankle began to ache about a year ago, but I thought it was just muscle pain. Mentioned it to my smart female general physician and she nailed it, sending me for an MRI. It showed significant cartilage loss on the left side. I have never been so surprised in my life; none of that in my family history. Pain is now unbearable and I cannot do much. I am booking a total hip replacement (THR) as we speak.

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Comment from: happier, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: January 05

June 1, 2010, (62 years old) after 6 months of right hip pain - holding walls to walk until circulation was reestablished after sitting - physical therapy, and steroid shots, I had a total hip replacement (THR). Hospitalization was 6 days due to anemia, home health care was one week, outpatient physical therapy was 3 weeks, and back to work in 6 weeks. I was cleared to drive and walk without a cane at two weeks. It was great to walk without pain and do everything I wanted without considering hip issues. In 2013, I began having a different type of pain with the left leg, such as groin pain, bursitis and knee soreness. I went for medical guidance and x-rays showed mild to severe hip osteoarthritis. I began two separate rounds of physical therapy, chiropractor visits and leg massages, all weekly for over a year. By July 2014, I was dragging my left leg. X-rays were not indicating a change so an MRI was done and it indicated a labrum tear, tendonitis, bursitis and multiple bone spurs on the femur ball. Surgery was scheduled 3 months out. Surgery was excellent, hospital stay 60 hours, walker at home 2 days, cane through 4th week when out of house, in home therapy 2 weeks, driving at two weeks, and outpatient physical therapy to be 4 weeks. The thigh swelling, soreness and tightness are all post-surgical issues which with each week get better and are within 10% of normal. At three weeks, soreness/tenderness on outside of thigh is still present but in time will disappear. The hip stiffness after sitting and upon first three steps is frustrating but should also be gone by 2nd to 3rd month. The left hip issues were much more progressed than the right and thus are taking longer to heal. I am thrilled to sleep and wake up/move without the hip bone on bone pain. The right surgeon is the key as well. I worked with the same surgeon both times, who is associated with a sports medicine center. I definitely agree with others that doing pre-surgery muscle improvement and having a healthy weight as well as a positive mindset will aid in recovery. I am so looking forward to a full recovery and running with my grandsons, again.

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Total Hip Replacement - Experience Question: Please describe your Total Hip Replacement experience.
Total Hip Replacement - Rehab Experience Question: Please share your experience with the rehabilitation process following total hip replacement surgery.
Total Hip Replacement - Prognosis Question: What has been the prognosis for you or your relative following total hip joint replacement?

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