Tongue Problems

  • Medical Author:
    Donna S. Bautista, DDS

    Dr. Donna S. Bautista, DDS, completed her undergraduate studies at the University of California, San Diego with a bachelor of arts in biochemistry and cell biology. During her time at UC San Diego, she was involved in basic research including studying processes related to DNA transcription in the field of molecular biology. Upon graduation, she went on to attend dental school at the University of California, San Francisco. In addition to her formal dental training, she provided dental care for underserved communities in the Bay Area through clinics and health fairs. She also worked toward mentoring high school students interested in the field of dentistry.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

White Tongue Symptoms and Signs

Whitening of the tongue can occur when there is a buildup or coating of bacteria and debris on the surface of the tongue due to:

  • mild dehydration,
  • illness (when there is less use of the tongue for talking or eating), or
  • dryness of the mouth.

A whitening of the top layer of the tongue or the presence of white spots or patches on the tongue can also be seen with infection, irritation, or chronic inflammation of the surface of the tongue. Certain oral infections, notably Candida yeast infections (known as oral thrush), are characterized by a white tongue.

Quick GuideTop Problems in Your Mouth

Top Problems in Your Mouth

Tongue facts

The tongue is a mobile group of muscles that is attached to the floor of the mouth. The top of the tongue is covered with small bumps called papillae. The majority of our taste buds sit on these papillae.

The tongue is used for tasting, swallowing, and chewing food. The tongue is also used to form words for speaking. Typically, a tongue that is pink and moist with a thin white coating on the surface is considered healthy. There are variations of surface texture that are normal and healthy as well. As many of us have experienced, a tongue injury (such as when we accidentally bite our tongue) can be quite painful since the tongue is such an instrumental part of our daily lives through eating and speaking. Though very few people know it, the tongue is actually a very good measure of the well-being of the body. This is why your doctor may use the tongue depressor to look in your mouth and tongue during an examination.

What are common tongue problems?

Some common problems associated with the tongue include:

  • discoloration,
  • increased size,
  • abnormalities of the surface,
  • growths (bumps), pain,
  • taste concerns, and
  • difficulty with movement.

What causes tongue problems?

There are a variety of causes of tongue problems, ranging from harmless to serious. Individuals can be born with a tongue condition that is harmless. A more serious condition such as tongue cancer can be related to risk factors such as smoking and drinking alcohol. Additionally, a tongue problem may be a result of an underlying medical condition.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/31/2017

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