ticlopidine, Ticlid (discontinued brand in the US)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

View Understanding Stroke Slideshow Pictures

GENERIC NAME: ticlopidine

BRAND NAME: Ticlid (Discontinued brand in the US)

DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Ticlopidine is an oral drug that inhibits the ability of platelets to clump and form blood clots. It prevents blood clots by binding to the P2Y12 receptor on platelets, preventing adenosine diphosphate (ADP) from activating platelets. It belongs to a class of drugs called P2Y12 inhibitors. Other drugs in this class include clopidogrel (Plavix), ticagrelor (Brilinta) and prasugrel (Effient). Clopidogrel is similar to ticlopidine (Ticlid) in chemical structure and in the way it works. Blood clots that form within the arteries of the brain or pieces of blood clots that break off from clots in other parts of the body and lodge in blood vessels in the brain cause strokes. Similarly, heart attacks occur when blood clots block an artery in the heart. In both cases the blood supply to part of the brain or heart is blocked, and that part of the brain or heart is damaged or dies. Ticlopidine works by making the blood less likely to clot, therefore, reducing the likelihood of a stroke or heart attack. The FDA approved ticlopidine in October 1991.

PRESCRIBED FOR: Ticlopidine is used for preventing strokes in patients who have a history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs or "mini-stroke"). It also is used for preventing blood clots in stents placed in the arteries of the heart. Non-FDA approved (off-label) uses include prevention of heart attacks in patients with unstable angina (that often precedes heart attacks) or who have experienced prior heart attacks; in combination with aspirin for preventing blood clots in stents; and for intermittent claudication (due to blockage by clots of blood flowing to the legs). Ticlopidine is most often used when aspirin has failed, is not tolerated, or cannot be used for other reasons. It is rarely used otherwise because of a serious side effect that can reduce white blood cells and platelets.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/22/2015

Quick GuideStroke: Causes, Symptoms, and Recovery

Stroke: Causes, Symptoms, and Recovery
FDA Logo

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

See more info: ticlopidine on RxList
RxList Logo

Need help identifying pills and medications?

Use the pill identifier tool on RxList.

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Heart Health Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors