Thyroid Scan

  • Medical Author:
    Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C)

    Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

View the Hyperthyroidism Slideshow Pictures

Quick GuideHyperthyroidism Pictures Slideshow: Keep Your Thyroid in Check

Hyperthyroidism Pictures Slideshow: Keep Your Thyroid in Check

What is the thyroid gland?

The thyroid is a gland that makes and stores essential hormones that help regulate the heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and the rate of chemical reactions (metabolism) in the body. It is located in the anterior neck just below the "Adam's apple."

Picture of Thyroid Gland
Picture of Thyroid Gland

The thyroid gland is the main part of the body that takes up iodine. In a thyroid scan, iodine is labeled with a radioactive tracer, and a special camera is used to measure how much tracer is absorbed from the bloodstream by the thyroid gland. If a patient is allergic to iodine, technetium can be used as an alternative.

How is the thyroid scan performed?

A thyroid scan is an outpatient procedure usually done in the nuclear medicine section of a hospital. This is usually part of the radiology department.

If you have a thyroid scan, you will be asked to take a drink, or swallow a pill containing the iodine. You will then wait for the iodine to be taken up by the thyroid - usually about 4 hours. At this time you lie under a scintography camera, and it will take pictures which correlate directly to the amount of iodine taken up by the thyroid. This is done by counting the intensity and location of the gamma rays emitted by the radioactively labeled iodine. You then leave the hospital, and return in 24 hours to have a second scan performed in the same manner.

There are no limitations during this 24 hour interval except that you will be asked to take precautions when you urinate. This is because the radioactive iodine is removed from your body by the urine, and it is safer to have others avoid contact with your urine during this time. Be sure to let the doctor performing the test know if you have an iodine allergy, or if you have ingested a lot of iodine-containing foods (like sushi) prior to the test.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/11/2015
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