The Best Life Diet (cont.)

What the Experts Say About The Best Life Diet

The Best Life Diet is based on science -- it supports the U.S. government's 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines with very doable and easy suggestions. And most registered dietitians and fitness trainers agree that true weight loss success comes from making lifestyle changes.

Greene's flexible approach helps dieters stick with the plan. But obesity expert Cathy Nonas, RD, wonders if his realistic, gradual approach will appeal to overweight people who want the quick fix.

"Once a person decides to lose weight, they want it gone immediately," says Nonas, former spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly American Dietetic Association). "And unfortunately, they choose fad diets [and] lose weight quickly only to regain it back instead of choosing a program like Best Life Diet that tackles changing eating behaviors."

Nonas says she likes the slow and gradual first phase followed by the more intense second and third phases.

"Anyone who gets through the first phase, regardless [of] if they lose weight, will improve their dietary picture," says Nonas. If you're not successful at losing weight during the first or second phase, "stick with the phase longer before moving on to maintenance," suggests Nonas.

Counting calories is too difficult and inaccurate. But if you cut out the sodas, fried foods, and giant white bagels, the calorie savings will add up.

"For people like me who already avoid the six perilous foods, it won't make much of a difference," says Nonas. "But for anyone who eats or drinks the high-calorie foods, it should help them lose weight."

Nonas also points out that some "forbidden" foods can be enjoyed in moderate portions.

"There is nothing wrong with high-fat dairy if you make modifications elsewhere in your diet, and likewise if you enjoy white pasta or white bread as long as you get enough fiber in your diet," she says

The bottom line, Nonas says, is that Greene's recommendations are sound for the most part. She suggests that dieters buy the book but ignore the branded merchandising.

"What is really important is not the brand of yogurt, but reading labels to choose a low-fat yogurt," she says.

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