thalidomide, Thalomid

  • Medical Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Cancer 101: A Visual Guide to Understanding Cancer

SIDE EFFECTS: The most common side effects are:

Other important side effects include:

Thalidomide also causes nerve damage (peripheral neuropathy), slow heart rate, hypertension, hypotension, and a decrease in white blood cells. Symptoms of nerve damage are tingling, numbness and pain in the feet or hands.

GENERIC AVAILABLE: No

PRESCRIPTION: Yes

PREPARATIONS: Capsules: 50, 100, 150, and 200 mg

STORAGE: Thalidomide should be store at room temperature 15 C - 30 C (59 F - 86 F) and protected from light.

DOSING: The recommended adult dose is 100-400 mg daily for treatment of leprosy. The dose for treating multiple myeloma is 200 mg daily in combination with dexamethasone. Thalidomide should be administered in the evening at least one hour after meals and with a full glass of water.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Thalidomide increases the sedative effect of alcohol and other drugs that cause drowsiness (for example, diazepam [Valium]). Drugs that slow heart rate add to the heart slowing effects of thalidomide. Examples of such drugs include calcium channel blockers (CCBs), beta blockers, and digoxin (Lanoxin). The incidence of peripheral neuropathy increases when thalidomide is combined with other drugs (for example, amiodarone [Cordarone], cisplatin, phenytoin [Dilantin, Dilantin-125]) that also cause peripheral neuropathy.

PREGNANCY: Thalidomide is very harmful to the fetus. Therefore, thalidomide should be avoided during pregnancy. Men and women who are taking thalidomide should use appropriate methods of birth control. Moreover, women of childbearing age should practice two forms of birth control concurrently. Men taking thalidomide should not donate sperm, and thalidomide users should not donate blood since the recipients of the sperm and blood may receive small amounts of thalidomide.

URSING MOTHERS: It is not known whether thalidomide is excreted in breast milk.

Medically reviewed by Eni Williams, PharmD

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/24/2015
FDA Logo

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

See more info: thalidomide on RxList
RxList Logo

Need help identifying pills and medications?

Use the pill identifier tool on RxList.

Subscribe to MedicineNet's Cancer Report Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors