Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome (TMJ)

  • Medical Author:
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Quick GuideDental Health: Top Problems in Your Mouth

Dental Health: Top Problems in Your Mouth

How do health-care professionals diagnose TMJ syndrome?

A doctor will diagnose TMJ syndrome by taking the patient's medical history and doing a physical exam to find the cause of the symptoms. There is no specific test to diagnose TMJ syndrome. A doctor may send the patient to an oral and maxillofacial specialist, an otolaryngologist (also called an ear, nose, and throat doctor or ENT specialist), or a dentist specializing in jaw disorders to confirm the diagnosis. Sometimes an MRI of the temporomandibular joint may be ordered to detect damage to the cartilage of the jaw joint and to rule out other medical problems.

A condition that may have some similar symptoms to TMJ syndrome is trigeminal neuralgia. The trigeminal nerve supplies nerve impulses to the temporomandibular joint, and when irritated, it can also cause facial pain. Other causes of face or neck pain include swollen lymph nodes (swollen glands), giant cell arteritis, salivary gland disease, sore throat, ill-fitting dentures, or dental braces. Continue Reading

Reviewed on 3/29/2016
References
REFERENCES:

American College of Prosthodontists. "Temporomandibular Joint Disorder & Facial/Jaw Pain." <http://www.gotoapro.org/temporomandibular-joint/>.

Scrivani, J., and Noshir R. Mehta. "Temporomandibular Disorders in Adults." UpToDate.com. Aug. 2015. <http://www.uptodate.com/contents/temporomandibular-disorders-in-adults?source=search_result&search=tmj&selectedTitle=1~77>.

"Study Evaluates Risk Factors for Chronic Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disoders." National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. 10 Nov. 2011.

"TMJ." Amerian Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. Dec. 2010.

The TMJ Association. "Arthroscopy." June 18, 2014. <http://tmj.org/site/page?pageId=263>.

"TMJ Disorders." National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Aug. 2013.

TMJ Hope. "TMJD Pain Management." <http://www.tmjhope.org/tmj-treatment/pain-management/>.

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