Tansy

How does Tansy work?

The chemicals in tansy increase saliva and blood flow to the tissues in the mouth, stomach, intestines, and pelvic area. Some researches think the chemicals may also have effects on the brain. Tansy extracts may decrease pain, increase bile production, and increase appetite in people with liver and gallbladder problems.

Are there safety concerns?

Tansy is UNSAFE when taken by mouth. It contains a poisonous chemical called thujone. People have died after taking as little as 10 drops of tansy oil. Deaths have also been reported from prepared tansy teas or powdered forms.

Short of death, tansy can cause restlessness, vomiting, severe diarrhea, stomach pain, dizziness, tremors, kidney or liver damage, bleeding, abortions in pregnant women, and seizures.

Tansy is also UNSAFE when applied to the skin. It can cause a severe skin reaction.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

It is UNSAFE for anyone to use tansy, but some people with the following conditions have extra reasons not to use it:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's UNSAFE to use tansy if you are pregnant. It could start your period, cause your uterus to contract, and cause an abortion.

It's also UNSAFE to use tansy if you are breast-feeding because of the poisonous thujone it contains.

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Tansy may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking tansy.

Porphyria, an inherited condition that affects metabolism: There is some concern that tansy might make this condition worse.


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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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