tacrine, (Cognex - discontinued in the U.S.)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

What is tacrine, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

  • Tacrine is an oral medication used to treat patients with Alzheimer's disease.
  • Tacrine is in a class of drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors that also includes rivastigmine (Exelon), donepezil (Aricept), and galantamine (Razadyne - formerly Reminyl). Cholinesterase inhibitors inhibit (block) the action of acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for the destruction of acetylcholine.
  • Acetylcholine is one of several neurotransmitters in the brain, chemicals that nerve cells use to communicate with one another. Reduced levels of acetylcholine in the brain are believed to be responsible for some of the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. By blocking the enzyme that destroys acetylcholine, rivastigmine increases the concentration of acetylcholine in the brain, and this increase is believed to be responsible for the improvement in thinking seen with tacrine.
  • Tacrine was approved by the FDA in 1993.

Is tacrine available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: No

Do I need a prescription for tacrine?

Yes

What are the uses for tacrine?

Tacrine is used for the treatment of mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

What are the side effects of tacrine?

The most common side effect of tacrine is an increase in a liver test called alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as a result of liver damage. When a patient starts taking tacrine, blood is drawn on a weekly basis to measure ALT. If there is an increase in blood ALT, the dosage of tacrine can be reduced. Other side effects of tacrine include:

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/22/2016

Quick GuideDementia, Alzheimer's Disease, and Aging Brains

Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, and Aging Brains
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