sunscreens - topical

19 Habits That Wreck Your Teeth

DRUG INTERACTIONS: If you are using this product under your doctor's direction, your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

OVERDOSE: This medicine may be harmful if swallowed. If swallowing or overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

NOTES: The sun produces two types of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, UVA and UVB. UVA radiation causes skin damage, premature aging, and skin reactions to medications, soaps, cosmetics, and other chemicals. UVB radiation causes sunburn. Both UVA and UVB radiation increase your risk of skin cancer. Most sunscreens protect against UVB radiation, but you should use a sunscreen with both UVA and UVB protection (broad-spectrum coverage). Products that protect against UVA include ingredients such as avobenzone, octocrylene, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and benzophenones such as oxybenzone. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions about selecting a product.Sun Protection Factor (SPF) is a rating that tells how much protection a product provides against sunburn. The higher the number, the greater the protection. An SPF of at least 15 is recommended. Products with SPF 30 provide high protection against sunburn. The FDA states that products with SPF above 30 provide a benefit that is not much greater than SPF 30 products.Water-resistant products provide protection for up to 40 minutes of water activity or sweating. Very water-resistant products protect for up to 80 minutes. Reapply sunscreen as often as necessary.Remember that water, sand, and snow reflect the sun. You should protect yourself with sunscreen when in these surroundings. Apply sunscreen even on cloudy days because the sun's radiation is still present. In addition to sunscreen, wear protective clothing (e.g., hat, long sleeves/pants, sunglasses) when outdoors, and stay in the shade when possible. Avoid prolonged sun exposure, especially between 10 AM to 4 PM when the sun's radiation is strongest.

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Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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