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  • Medical Author:
    Patricia S. Bainter, MD

    Dr. Bainter is a board-certified ophthalmologist. She received her BA from Pomona College in Claremont, CA, and her MD from the University of Colorado in Denver, CO. She completed an internal medicine internship at St. Joseph Hospital in Denver, CO, followed by an ophthalmology residency and a cornea and external disease fellowship, both at the University of Colorado. She became board certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology in 1998 and recertified in 2008. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Dr. Bainter practices general ophthalmology including cataract surgery and management of corneal and anterior segment diseases. She has volunteered in eye clinics in the Dominican Republic and Bosnia. She currently practices at One to One Eye Care in San Diego, CA.

  • Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

    John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

View the Eye Diseases and Conditions Slideshow Pictures

Quick GuideCommon Eye Problems and Infections

Common Eye Problems and Infections

What types of doctors treat a sty?

Primary-care providers, including pediatricians, often diagnose and treat styes. Eye specialists, including optometrists and ophthalmologists, are called upon to treat more advanced cases such as those that appear infected or those that recur.

How do health-care professionals diagnose a sty (stye)?

The doctor will examine the lids to locate the opening of the plugged gland. This helps to distinguish between a hordeolum and a chalazion. Also, the doctor will look for signs of scar tissue, foreign bodies, and underlying chronic meibomitis.

In addition, the doctor will look for any signs that the gland may have become infected. It is particularly important to identify infection that has spread from the gland to the neighboring skin, tissue around the eye, or the eye itself. Continue Reading

Reviewed on 5/27/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Ben Simon, G. J., et al. "Intralesional triamcinolone acetonide injection versus incision and curettage for primary chalazia: a prospective, randomized study." American Journal of Ophthalmology 151.4 (2011): 714-718.

Driver, P. J. and M. A. Lemp. "Meibomian gland dysfunction." Survey of Ophthalmology 40.5 (1996): 343-367.

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