Strep Throat

  • Medical Author:
    John Mersch, MD, FAAP

    Dr. Mersch received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, San Diego, and prior to entering the University Of Southern California School Of Medicine, was a graduate student (attaining PhD candidate status) in Experimental Pathology at USC. He attended internship and residency at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.

  • Medical Editor: Steven Doerr, MD
    Steven Doerr, MD

    Steven Doerr, MD

    Steven Doerr, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Doerr received his undergraduate degree in Spanish from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He graduated with his Medical Degree from the University Of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado in 1998 and completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine from Denver Health Medical Center in Denver, Colorado in 2002, where he also served as Chief Resident.

Quick GuideCommon Sore Throat vs. Strep Throat

Common Sore Throat vs. Strep Throat

Is strep throat contagious

Strep throat is moderately contagious and is most commonly spread via direct person-to-person contact. Passage of airborne droplets and/or saliva from the infected individual to another is the most likely mechanism of contracting strep throat. As such, close living quarters (home, classroom, day care centers, college dorms, etc.) provide an ideal environment for passage of GAS bacteria from one person to another. The risk of contracting a strep throat infection is approximately 40% in household environments. Most infectious disease specialists believe that a patient is no longer contagious after 24 hours of effective antibiotic therapy. Spread of strep bacteria via food borne transmission is less common than direct person-to-person exchange of droplets or saliva. The exact likelihood of developing strep throat from family pets is unknown, but most experts believe it is minimal. Continue Reading

Reviewed on 4/20/2015
References
REFERENCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics Red Book. Group A Streptococcal Infections. 2012: 668.

CDC.gov. Is it Strep Throat?

Pichichero, Michael. Group A Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Infections. Pediatrics in Review. 1998; 19: 291-302.

Wald, Ellen. Antibiotic Treatment of Pharyngitis. Pediatrics in Review. 2001; 22: 255.

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