Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) in Men

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

View Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Slideshow Pictures

Quick GuideSTDs Pictures Slideshow: Facts About Sexually Transmitted Diseases

STDs Pictures Slideshow: Facts About Sexually Transmitted Diseases

What is the prognosis for STDs in men?

When untreated, some otherwise treatable STDs can spread throughout the body, causing serious consequences. Gonorrhea and syphilis are examples of treatable conditions that can cause serious consequences if not treated. HIV infection causes immune suppression that can lead to death from cancers or rare infections, although treatments are available to postpone or delay the immunosuppressive actions of the virus. Both HCV and HBV to a lesser extent can cause liver damage that sometimes progresses to liver failure. Herpes infection persists throughout life, with the possibility of future outbreaks of the illness.

Can STDs in men be prevented?

Using condoms can help prevent the transmission of many STDs, but no method of prevention is 100% safe. Sometimes, STDs may affect areas not ordinarily covered by a condom during sexual activity. Prevention can also be difficult because many people will not show specific signs or symptoms of an STD even though they may be infected. While abstinence from sexual activity is the only absolute way to prevent STDs, limiting the number of sexual partners can help reduce risk of exposure to infections. Early diagnosis and recognition of infections as well as counseling about STDs and risk can help avoid further spread of infections.

REFERENCE:

"Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)." U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 22 Oct. 2013.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/22/2016
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