sodium chloride solution (intravenous)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

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PRESCRIPTION: Yes

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

PREPARATIONS:

  • Sodium chloride diluent for injection: 0.9%
  • Sodium chloride solution for injection: 0.9% prefilled syringe, normal saline flush 0.9% solution, sodium chloride 0.45% solution (1/2 NS), sodium chloride hypertonic 3% solution, sodium chloride hypertonic 5% solution.

STORAGE: Sodium chloride preparations should be stored at room temperature between 59 F to 86 F (15 C to 30 C).

DOSING: Dosing of sodium chloride intravenous solution varies. Total volume of administration depends on many factors including condition being treated, laboratory results, and other patient specific characteristics.

Systemic administration of sodium chloride solution should be done with extreme caution as rapid or overt administration may cause complications such as:

DRUG INTERACTIONS:

Although use of sodium chloride solution has not been associated with any serious or life threatening drug interactions, unintended increases in sodium and water retention may occur when used with corticosteroids.

Use of sodium chloride intravenous solution may increase the renal elimination of lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid). Lithium concentrations and control of symptoms should be monitored frequently in patients receiving IV sodium chloride.

Use of tolvaptan (Samsca) with hypertonic preparations of sodium chloride (3% or 5% solution for injection) is not recommended as rapid correction of hyponatremia (low levels of sodium in the blood) increases the risk of osmotic demyelination (nerve damage).

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/12/2015
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