Snake Bite (cont.)

Medical Author:
Medical Editor:
Medical Editor:

Snake bites and snake pictures

Snakebite. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), a dangerous Asian elapid and longest of the venomous snakes at around 4 m (13 ft). Photograph by Joe McDonald.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Snakebite. Black mamba (Dendraspis polylepis), an extremely fast, large, and dangerous African elapid. Photograph by Joe McDonald.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Snakebite. Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius), a shy American elapid that accounts for only about 1% of venomous snakebites in the United States. Recognize it by this catch phrase: "Red on yellow, kill a fellow." Photograph by Joe McDonald.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Snakebite. Milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), a harmless mimic of the coral snake. "Red on black, venom lack," although this old saying becomes unreliable south of the United States. Photograph by Joe McDonald.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Snakebite. Western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox), an American pit viper, with rattle vibrating. This is one of the most dangerous snakes of North America. Photograph by Joe McDonald.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Snakebite. Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus), American pit viper, caught yawning after a big meal. Photograph by Joe McDonald.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Snakebite. Cottonmouth or water moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorous), American pit viper usually found in or near water. Photograph by Joe McDonald.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Snakebite. Northern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix), an American pit viper. Bites by this species tend to be less severe than rattlesnake or water moccasin bites but still require urgent medical attention. Photograph by Joe McDonald.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Snakebite Pictures

Spitting cobra bite. Many elapid bites result in little local swelling, but the spitting cobras are known for the amount of swelling and tissue damage they can cause. Photograph by Clyde Peeling.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) bite. Rattlesnake bites can cause severe swelling, pain, and permanent tissue damage. Photograph by Clyde Peeling.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) bite. These bites usually result in local pain and swelling but usually have less tissue loss than rattlesnake bites. Photograph by Tom Diaz.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) bite. Pit viper bites can cause a leakage of blood cells out of the blood vessels, even on parts of the body away from the bite site. Note the significant bruising of the upper forearm and arm. Photograph by Clyde Peeling.
Click to view original file

Media type: Photo

REFERENCES:

CDC.gov. Venomous Snakes.

UpToDate.com. Principles of snake bite management worldwide.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/5/2013

Patient Comments

Viewers share their comments

Snake Bite - Experience Question: Please share your experience with snake bite.
Snake Bite - Symptoms Question: Please describe the symptoms you experienced from a snake bite.
Snake Bite - Treatment Question: What was the treatment for a snake bite?
Snake Bite - Complications Question: Please describe any complications you experienced due to a snake bite.