Patient Comments: Smoking (How to Quit Smoking) - Obstacles

Question:What are/were your biggest obstacles in quitting smoking?

Comment from: zahara, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: December 14

I smoked for more than 30 years. I've tried everything to quit and none of it worked. One day a friend stated she'd hit 3 weeks smoke free and felt great - I asked her how she did it. She had gotten the book "Easy Way to Stop Smoking" by Alan Carr - she said she read it and quit - it was actually easy. I went to Amazon - read the reviews, saw it didn't cost much so thought "what the heck, worth a shot." I got it. I read it. I quit smoking once I finished it. That was Mother's Day of 2012, it's now almost Christmas (2012). It was easy! No pain, no suffering, no weight gain, no pills, patches, gum, mood swings, whatever. Seriously. Now, I do realize I am an addict - so there is no way I want to be around it or even to smell it - and sometimes my addicted brain plays tricks on me and tells me that my day would be better if I would go get a smoke - but I think of the suffering I went through - that I hated smoking but had to because of my addiction - that it was killing me - and I tell that part of my brain to get lost, and I get on with my life. Happy that I don't have to smoke anymore! And that little addiction speaks to me less and less as time goes on - and it's not hard to smack it back down at all. Please go read the reviews and then order it.

Comment from: dougm, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: March 28

No way is quitting easy if you are an addict. I had to have the emergency detoxify me and it was day two I could not get through. I took 5 days of sodium drip IV and 10 bags of potassium. I also had to adjust my bi-polar medicine lithium which dropped from 450 mg 3 times daily to 300 mg 2 times daily. I also went on Lamictal. Again, I am bi polar and an addict. I started at age 25 and quit at age 51; it was very hard for me but finally quit.

Comment from: grannyb, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: August 02

I've done hypnosis, Wellburin, and, finally, Chantix. The Chantix made me suicidal; the Welbrutin did nothing except make me want to sleep. The hypnosis worked for several weeks, down to 1 cig a day, until a fellow employee dropped dead at my feet. I reached for a cig. Does anyone out there have something? I've smoked for over 50 years. My husband died of lung cancer this is nuts! But, I still smoke, am ostracized by most folks, yet, the folks who do continue to smoke are the best people to interact with. I know that cold turkey is the best way, but you've got to get there!

Comment from: Ashley Williams, 25-34 Female (Caregiver) Published: October 13

Nice blog and thought provoking article!!

Comment from: smoke be gone, 45-54 (Patient) Published: October 29

I am trying to quit cold turkey, but it is hard, the dizzy head and feeling really tired make it difficult to concentrate at work. But I will keep trying.

Comment from: Shamrock, 19-24 Male Published: September 21

The biggest thing is to find ways to help stop smoking. It's hard at first to cope with it.

Comment from: Colin, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: May 09

I think the biggest obstacle I faced was, refusing to have a smoke when I was drinking the beers. It was so hard, but it ended up so worth it and now I've been off for almost 2 months strong. However, I packed on a little extra weight and have taken to normal chewing gum to counter the habit of putting something in my mouth all the time. Stay hard, folks and lets all kick smoking in the butt together.

Comment from: mayflower, 45-54 Female (Caregiver) Published: May 24

My biggest obstacle in quitting was my morning coffee, my coffee break, being held in traffic jams and being around friends who smoke. I'm still on champix and at times still have the urge for a fag but I do my best to control myself. Also, I read a lot about quitting smoking and the benefits of staying free.

Comment from: lupinedream, 19-24 Male (Patient) Published: February 17

My biggest obstacle in quitting smoking was that certain things during the day would "trigger" a temptation to smoke, like I had to have my first cigarette immediately when I woke up, rain or blizzard, I had to be out there. Another "trigger" was right after eating, right after showering (which really doesn't make sense because I often took a shower to get away from the nasty smell (when you are a smoker you don't realize how bad it is!) I failed about two weeks ago going cold turkey but now I am using the gum which seems to help a lot. One day thirteen hours so far but with pretty heavy cravings, the gum does take the edge off for me! I am chewing about 8 pieces a day once every two hours or so. I quit successfully on the patch about two years ago. It is true your first attempt almost never works! Keep trying! Be motivated, that is the key! I have a few good friends to call if I get cravings. Seems like my cell phone addiction takes precedence over the nicotine.


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