Skin Tag

  • Medical Author:
    Gary W. Cole, MD, FAAD

    Dr. Cole is board certified in dermatology. He obtained his BA degree in bacteriology, his MA degree in microbiology, and his MD at the University of California, Los Angeles. He trained in dermatology at the University of Oregon, where he completed his residency.

  • Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

What does a skin tag look like?

Skin Tags: Should They Be Removed?

Most doctors recommend removal of skin tags only when they are irritated or a source of discomfort, or if they constitute a cosmetic problem. Skin tags can be easily removed in the doctor's office by tying or cutting them after injecting a small amount of a local anesthetic. Freezing, a technique sometimes used to remove warts or other benign lesions of the skin, is also sometimes performed for the removal of skin tags.

Quick GuideRosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases

Rosacea, Acne, Shingles: Common Adult Skin Diseases

Skin tag facts

  • Skin tags are very common small, soft skin growths.
  • Skin tags are harmless but can be annoying.
  • Skin tags tend to occur on the eyelids, neck, armpits, groin folds, and under breasts.
  • A person may have anywhere from one to hundreds of skin tags.
  • Almost everyone will develop a skin tag at some point in their lives.
  • Middle-aged, obese adults are most prone to skin tags.
  • Obesity is associated with skin tags.
  • Removing a skin tag does not cause more to grow.
  • Destructive treatments include freezing, tying off with a thread or suture, or cutting off the skin tag. Continue Reading

Reviewed on 2/17/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Fitzpatrick, Thomas B., et al. Dermatology in General Medicine. 4th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993.

Schwartz, Robert A. "Acrochordon." Medscape.com. Apr. 25, 2011. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1060373-overview>.

Shah, R., A. Jindal, and N.M. Patel. "Acrochordons as a Cutaneous Sign of Metabolic Syndrome: A Case-Control Study." Ann Med Health Sci Res 4.2 Mar.-Apr. 2014: 202-205.

IMAGES:

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3.Dr. Nili N. Alai

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15.iStock, Schweintechnik

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17.Dr. Nili N. Alai

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