Seborrhea (cont.)

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If over-the-counter products don't work, what can the doctor prescribe for dandruff?

A primary-care physician or dermatologist can recommend prescription-strength shampoos or antifungal and corticosteroid creams that are stronger than those available over the counter, yet are not too strong to use on the face. There also are corticosteroid-based liquids, gels, and foams that one can apply to the scalp that won't leave the hair limp and matted. Nonsteroid preparations like tacrolimus (Protopic) or pimecrolimus (Elidel) can also help.

As with all seborrhea (dandruff) treatments, medicated shampoos and cortisone creams calm down the skin or scalp sensitivity, but they can't stop the seborrhea (dandruff) from coming back. Most people, however, only have to treat their condition from time to time when it becomes itchy or noticeable.

A word on eyelashes

Dandruff (seborrhea) of the eyelashes can be both annoying and hard to treat. Eye doctors like to recommend scrubbing the lashes with baby shampoo on a cotton swab. Corticosteroid-based lotions should be used close to the eye only under medical supervision since continuous exposure of the eye to these products can lead to serious eye problems.


Turner, G.A., M. Hoptroff, and C.R. Harding. "Stratum Corneum Dysfunction in Dandruff." International Journal of Cosmetic Science 34 (2012): 298-306.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/21/2015

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Seborrhea - Treatments Question: What treatments have you tried for your seborrhea (dandruff)? What works for you?
Seborrhea - Remedies Question: What home remedies have been effective for your seborrhea?
Dandruff - Treatments That Don't Work Question: Please discuss remedies or lifestyle changes you've tried for dandruff that don't work.
Dandruff - Prescriptions Question: Did you see a doctor for your dandruff? What was prescribed, and was it effective?