Thyroid Blood Tests - Why Testing

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Why did you have thyroid blood tests performed?

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Are there other tests of the thyroid gland?

The blood tests mentioned above can confirm the presence of deficiency or an excess of thyroid hormone and, therefore, be used to diagnose hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. They do not point to a specific cause. In order to determine a cause of the thyroid abnormality, the doctor will consider the patient's history, physical examination, and medical condition. Further testing might be used to isolate an underlying cause. These tests might include more blood testing for thyroid antibodies, nuclear medicine thyroid scanning, ultrasound of the thyroid gland, or others.

If thyroid cancer is suspected and surgery may be required, your physician may ask for a blood test known as thyroglobulin. Thyroglobulin is a protein made only by thyroid cells. If the thyroglobulin level at baseline is detectable or elevated (this means the gland does in fact make the protein) it can be used as a tumor marker. After a total thyroidectomy for cancer (removal of the entire thyroid gland) the level should fall to an undetectable range since the cells that make thyroglobulin have been removed. If the level remains detectable after surgery, there is a possibility of thyroid tissue elsewhere in the body, and metastatic disease should be considered. If the level is undetectable for a period of time after surgery and then starts to climb, a recurrence of the cancer - either at the primary site or elsewhere in the body should be considered.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: Notwell, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: May 20

I was diagnosed 10 years ago with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It took three years of adjusting my Synthroid (from 25mcg to 137mcg) and I felt well for a long time. When I recently began having dizziness and shortness of breath (along with body pain and stiffness) my doctor suspected a lung or cardiac disorder. After waiting for a CT and pulmonary tests, the symptoms led me to the ER, and my TSH came in at 8.48. My doctor had said my TSH was normal, however, I know from the years of trials; I am only feeling well below a TSH of 2. Everyone is different, and I now know to ask for an increased dosage of Synthroid to lower my TSH. I hope it starts to work before I end up with cardiac damage.

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Comment from: cozworth, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: April 04

I am on levothyroxine and my bloods came back at 6 where they should of been between 4/5 and my doctor has told me that I should double up on my tablets to 100mg I asked if I could just take the 75mg as I was on 50mg as I am also diabetic and have to inject myself but he was not any help at all he just told me that I was an adult and other people where on higher doses and to just get on with it, so I need to know if I need the extra with it only being just over the 5 I have an underactive thyroid.

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