Parkinson's Disease - Treatments

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What is the treatment for Parkinson's disease?

There is currently no treatment to cure Parkinson's disease. Several therapies are available to delay the onset of motor symptoms and to ameliorate motor symptoms. All of these therapies are designed to increase the amount of dopamine in the brain either by replacing dopamine, mimicking dopamine, or prolonging the effect of dopamine by inhibiting its breakdown. Studies have shown that early therapy in the non-motor stage can delay the onset of motor symptoms, thereby extending quality of life.

The most effective therapy for Parkinson's disease is levodopa (Sinemet), which is converted to dopamine in the brain. However, because long-term treatment with levodopa can lead to unpleasant side effects (a shortened response to each dose, painful cramps, and involuntary movements), its use is often delayed until motor impairment is more severe. Levodopa is frequently prescribed together with carbidopa (Sinemet), which prevents levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. Co-treatment with carbidopa allows for a lower levodopa dose, thereby reducing side effects.

In earlier stages of Parkinson's disease, substances that mimic the action of dopamine (dopamine agonists), and substances that reduce the breakdown of dopamine (monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors) can be very efficacious in relieving motor symptoms. Unpleasant side effects of these preparations are quite common, including swelling caused by fluid accumulation in body tissues, drowsiness, constipation, dizziness, hallucinations, and nausea.

For some individuals with advanced, virtually unmanageable motor symptoms, surgery may be an option. In deep brain stimulation (DBS), the surgeon implants electrodes to stimulate areas of the brain involved in movement. In another type of surgery, specific areas in the brain that cause Parkinson's symptoms are destroyed.

An alternative approach that has been explored is the use of dopamine-producing cells derived from stem cells. While stem cell therapy has great potential, more research is required before such cells can become of therapeutic value in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

In addition to medication and surgery, general lifestyle changes (rest and exercise), physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy may be beneficial.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: shlawa, 75 or over Male (Caregiver) Published: October 08

My husband was diagnosed at age 74 with Parkinson's disease. He was put on Senemet for 6 months and then Siferol was introduced and replaced the Senemet. During this time span he was also diagnosed with dementia. He started having hallucinations, lost touch with reality. Suspecting it was the medication I took him off the Siferol (with the doctor's knowledge). He has improved dramatically.

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Comment from: Tom, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: October 31

I was diagnosed nearly 10 years ago, when I was 38. I am now almost 48 and my Parkinson's disease (PD) is still fairly well controlled. I have started to have some difficulties between doses and have had to watch that more carefully the last year or so. I am still living independently, and yes, from what my screen name suggests, I still play the violin, but I had to stop playing at the symphony level some years ago. I still play "fiddle" type music quite well and enjoy it a lot, although if I'm not careful with medications and preparation I can have a "melt-down" and have to take a break from playing for a half-hour while I calm down and medicines kick in. Rather embarrassing at a show, but it only happens every once in a while. Life is still good!

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