Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction - Treatments

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What is the treatment for sacroiliac joint dysfunction?

As stated above, injections into the SI joint can provide both diagnosis and treatment. The duration of pain relief from injection can last from one day to much more long term. The injections can be repeated each month up to three each year. Oral anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs, ibuprofen [Motrin], naproxen [Naprosyn]) are often effective in pain relief as well. These can be taken long term if the patient does not have any other medical problems that prevent them from taking these medications. Oral steroids (prednisone) are provided for short periods of time in some cases, as well to treat the inflammation.

Physical therapy can be very helpful. Pain in the SI joint is often related to either too much motion or not enough motion in the joint. A physical therapist can teach various stretching or stabilizing exercises that can help reduce the pain. A sacroiliac belt is a device that wraps around the hips to help stabilize the SI joints, which can also help the SI joint pain. Other options to stabilize the SI joints include yoga, manual therapy, and Pilates.

If other treatments fail and pain continues to interfere with normal activities, surgery might be an option. Surgery for SI dysfunction involves a fusion of the SI joints. In this surgery, the cartilage covering the surfaces of the SI joints is removed and the bones are held together with plates and screws until they grow together (fuse). This eliminates all motion at the SI joints and typically relieves the pain. This should be considered only if other less invasive treatments have not been successful.

Return to Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction (SI Joint Pain)

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Comment from: lefty in SF, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: January 09

On vacation late last month I had a "knife in the lower left back" episode - severe pain. I saw a friend who is a chiropractor and I had instant relief in two treatments. Upon returning home I saw another chiropractor who discussed the connections between the nerves and the joints. He used both LED and other techniques and I feel much, much better.

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Comment from: Painfulsijoint, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: March 13

I have had such bad SI joint pain you want to stab a knife in the area of pain. I went to a pain management office. I was given Gralise, I take 1800 mg every day at 5:00pm with food. It has really helped along with muscle relaxant and Nucynta ER. It was the worst pain I have ever had. Neurontin is another name but Gralise has added areas that breakdown the way the medicine works faster and to the area faster. What a difference!

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