Uterine Cancer - Treatments

Not ready to share? Read other Patient Comments

What was the treatment for your uterine cancer?

Share your story with others:

MedicineNet appreciates your comment. Your comment may be displayed on the site and will always be published anonymously.Patient Comments FAQs

Enter your Comment

Tell us a bit about your background to make your comments more useful to other MedicineNet users. (Optional)

Screen Name: *

Gender of Patient: Male Female

Age Range of Patient:

I am a: Patient Caregiver


* Screen Name will appear next to the published comment. Please do not include your full name or email address.

By submitting your comment, and other materials (collectively referred to as a "Submission") to MedicineNet, you grant MedicineNet permission to use, copy, transmit, publish, display, edit and modify your Submission in connection with its Web site. MedicineNet will not pay you for your Submission. You represent that you have all rights necessary for MedicineNet to use your Submission as set forth above.

Please keep these guidelines in mind when writing your comment:

  • Please make sure you address the question asked.
  • Due to the overwhelming number of comments received, not all comments will be published.
  • When selecting comments to publish, our staff will choose those that are educational and complement the topic. Please try to stay on topic.
  • Your comment may be edited. We would typically edit comments to make them clearer and more readable. We will remove personal information such as last names, email and web addresses, and other potentially harmful information.
  • We will not notify you if your comment has been published. We suggest that you check back on the topic article regularly.
  • We do not provide medical or healthcare advice, treatment, or diagnosis.

Thank you for participating!


I have read and agree to abide by the MedicineNet Terms and Conditions and the MedicineNet Privacy Policy (required).

To prevent our systems from spam, please complete the following prior to submitting your comment.

Please select the white square:

What are treatment options for uterine cancer?

Treatment options for people with uterine cancer are surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. You may receive more than one type of treatment.

The treatment that's right for you depends mainly on the following:

  • Whether the tumor has invaded the muscle layer of the uterus
  • Whether the tumor has invaded tissues outside the uterus
  • Whether the tumor has spread to other parts of the body
  • The grade of the tumor
  • Your age and general health

You may have a team of specialists to help plan your treatment. Your doctor may refer you to a specialist, or you may ask for a referral. Specialists who treat uterine cancer include gynecologists, gynecologic oncologists (doctors who specialize in treating female cancers), medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists. Your health care team may also include an oncology nurse and a registered dietitian.

Your health care team can describe your treatment choices, the expected results of each, and the possible side effects. Because cancer therapy often damages healthy cells and tissues, side effects are common. Before treatment starts, ask your health care team about possible side effects and how treatment may change your normal activities. You and your health care team can work together to develop a treatment plan that meets your needs.

At any stage of disease, supportive care is available to control pain and other symptoms, to relieve the side effects of treatment, and to ease emotional concerns. Information about such care is available on NCI's Web site at http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/coping.

Also, NCI's Cancer Information Service can answer your questions about supportive care. Call 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237). Or chat using LiveHelp, NCI's instant messaging service, at http://www.cancer.gov/livehelp.

You may want to talk with your doctor about taking part in a clinical trial. Clinical trials are research studies testing new treatments. They are an important option for people with all stages of uterine cancer. See the Taking Part in Cancer Research section.

You may want to ask your doctor these questions before you begin treatment:

  • What is the grade of the tumor? What is the stage of the disease? Has the tumor invaded the muscle layer of the uterus or spread to other organs?
  • What are my treatment choices? Which do you suggest for me? Why?
  • What are the expected benefits of each kind of treatment?
  • What can I do to prepare for treatment?
  • Will I need to stay in the hospital? If so, for how long?
  • What are the risks and possible side effects of each treatment? How can side effects be managed?
  • What is the treatment likely to cost? Will my insurance cover it?
  • How will treatment affect my normal activities?
  • Would a research study (clinical trial) be a good choice for me?
  • Can you recommend other doctors who could give me a second opinion about my treatment options?
  • How often should I have checkups?
Return to Uterine Cancer

See what others are saying

Comment from: sadiesol, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: January 05

I'm 56, and I have had stomach problems seriously since last January 2010 (and off and on before that too - I thought it might be stress related. My Mom passed of ovarian cancer; my oldest sister just had a bout with breast cancer and is a 2 years survivor. I had an abnormal sonogram showing thickening so they are taking me in Friday for a D&C biopsy. They are doing it quite quickly. I have only had the stomach pains none of the other symptoms so I am hoping for the best. Pray for me as I will for all of you writing in here.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: Mary, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: May 09

I spotted in January 2013. After pelvic exam, I had a D&C in April 2013 and was diagnosed with stage 1 uterine cancer but aggressive type. I had a hysterectomy, and it had not spread. I had three rounds of chemotherapy and six rounds of radiation and then three more rounds of chemotherapy. All treatments ended in October. I opted for this treatment because my oncologist felt this was the thing to do. Only side effect I had was that I lost my hair. But as of this day my hair has grown back about 4 inches. Both my obstetrician/gynecologist and oncologist were great.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

STAY INFORMED

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!