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Are there different types of eczema? What causes and risk factors of eczema?

There are at least 11 different types of skin conditions that produce eczema. In order to develop a rational treatment plan, it is important to distinguish them. This is often not easy.

  1. Atopic dermatitis: This health condition has a genetic basis and produces a common type of eczema. Atopic dermatitis tends to begin early in life in those with a predisposition to inhalant allergies, but it probably does not have an allergic basis. Characteristically, rashes occur on the cheeks, neck, elbow and knee creases, and ankles.
  2. Irritant dermatitis: This occurs when the skin is repeatedly exposed to excessive washing or toxic substances.
  3. Allergic contact dermatitis: After repeated exposures to the same substance, an allergen, the body's immune recognition system becomes activated at the site of the next exposure and produces eczema. An example of this would be poison ivy allergy.
  4. Stasis dermatitis: It commonly occurs on the swollen lower legs of people who have poor circulation in the veins of the legs.
  5. Fungal infections: This can produce a pattern identical to many other types of eczema, but the fungus can be visualized with a scraping under the microscope or grown in culture.
  6. Scabies: It's caused by an infestation by the human itch mite and may produce a rash very similar to other forms of eczema.
  7. Pompholyx (dyshidrotic eczema): This is a common but poorly understood health condition which classically affects the hands and occasionally the feet by producing an itchy rash composed of tiny blisters (vesicles) on the sides of the fingers or toes and palms or soles.
  8. Lichen simplex chronicus: It produces thickened plaques of skin commonly found on the shins and neck.
  9. Nummular eczema: This is a nonspecific term for coin-shaped plaques of scaling skin most often on the lower legs of older individuals.
  10. Xerotic (dry skin) eczema: The skin will crack and ooze if dryness becomes excessive.
  11. Seborrheic dermatitis: It produces a rash on the scalp, face, ears, and occasionally the mid-chest in adults. In infants, in can produce a weepy, oozy rash behind the ears and can be quite extensive, involving the entire body.
Return to Eczema

See what others are saying

Comment from: EzcemaGone, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: January 24

My eczema was mainly focused on the normal areas that happen with this skin condition. I would get it really bad in between my knees, it would get bad in the folds of my elbows, and really bad on my hands. I found a really good calamine lotion eczema couldn't happen against though. Antimony but tough hand lotion, I was really able to get rid of the redness and it was easy to keep in my purse and use instead of regular soap. Again, this product isn't made for treating this type of problem, but in my experience, has made sufficient impact on my quality of life. Please look into a product that works for your skin. Stop using products and soaps that keep making you break out and have flairs ups.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: Jennifer.E, 7-12 (Caregiver) Published: September 20

I went to 2 different dermatologists. They did nothing. I used Foderma serum and after 2 or 3 months the eczema on my face faded and was nearly gone. Save your money at the doctor's if you have hard-to-treat eczema and go with this!

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: sarve_naz, 25-34 Female (Caregiver) Published: March 18

I think my eczema occurred because of a shortage in calcium and Vitamin D3. I feel these supplements are very important.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

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