GERD - Diet

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What diet and lifestyle changes have you made to improve your GERD and heartburn?

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Lifestyle changes and GERD (acid reflux) diet

As discussed above, reflux of acid is more injurious at night than during the day. At night, when individuals are lying down, it is easier for reflux to occur. The reason that it is easier is because gravity is not opposing the reflux, as it does in the upright position during the day. In addition, the lack of an effect of gravity allows the refluxed liquid to travel further up the esophagus and remain in the esophagus longer. These problems can be overcome partially by elevating the upper body in bed. The elevation is accomplished either by putting blocks under the bed's feet at the head of the bed or, more conveniently, by sleeping with the upper body on a foam rubber wedge. These maneuvers raise the esophagus above the stomach and partially restore the effects of gravity. It is important that the upper body and not just the head be elevated. Elevating only the head does not raise the esophagus and fails to restore the effects of gravity.

Elevation of the upper body at night generally is recommended for all patients with GERD. Nevertheless, most patients with GERD have reflux only during the day and elevation at night is of little benefit for them. It is not possible to know for certain which patients will benefit from elevation at night unless acid testing clearly demonstrates night reflux. However, patients who have heartburn, regurgitation, or other symptoms of GERD at night are probably experiencing reflux at night and definitely should elevate their upper body when sleeping. Reflux also occurs less frequently when patients lie on their left rather than their right sides.

GERD diet

Several changes in eating habits can be beneficial in treating GERD. Reflux is worse following meals. This probably is so because the stomach is distended with food at that time and transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter are more frequent. Therefore, smaller and earlier evening meals may reduce the amount of reflux for two reasons. First, the smaller meal results in lesser distention of the stomach. Second, by bedtime, a smaller and earlier meal is more likely to have emptied from the stomach than is a larger one. As a result, reflux is less likely to occur when patients with GERD lie down to sleep.

Certain foods are known to reduce the pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter and thereby promote reflux. These foods should be avoided and include:

  • chocolate,
  • peppermint,
  • alcohol, and
  • caffeinated drinks.

Fatty foods (which should be decreased) and smoking (which should be stopped) also reduce the pressure in the sphincter and promote reflux.

In addition, patients with GERD may find that other foods aggravate their symptoms. Examples are spicy or acid-containing foods, like citrus juices, carbonated beverages, and tomato juice. These foods should also be avoided if they provoke symptoms.

One novel approach to the treatment of GERD is chewing gum. Chewing gum stimulates the production of more bicarbonate-containing saliva and increases the rate of swallowing. After the saliva is swallowed, it neutralizes acid in the esophagus. In effect, chewing gum exaggerates one of the normal processes that neutralize acid in the esophagus. It is not clear, however, how effective chewing gum is in treating heartburn. Nevertheless, chewing gum after meals is certainly worth a try.

Return to GERD (Acid Reflux, Heartburn)

See what others are saying

Comment from: gerdified, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: August 20

Chewing gum while experiencing heartburns helps me a lot. it does help when you feel acid up your throat, because it increases saliva that helps in the flow in your esophagus, thus, acid is washed off, thereby causing decrease in heartburns.

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Comment from: Marlene, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: December 08

I have had daily heartburn for several years. I have tried everything, including proton pump inhibitors. I don't want to take a medication every day forever. Tums causes a rebound effect for me. It's been very worrisome and frustrating. Quite by accident, I've found two natural foods that have taken away heartburn! I bought some snack foods, hazelnuts and dried pineapple were two of the things I bought. After two days I astonishingly noticed I did not have heartburn! I started an elimination study to discover the cause. I learned it was hazelnuts and the dried pineapple, either one alone or both together. It is a miracle for me. I just wanted to share in case it might be helpful for someone else.

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