Staph Infection - Experience

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What is Staphylococcus?

Staphylococcus is a group of bacteria that can cause a number of diseases as a result of infection of various tissues of the body. Staphylococcus is more familiarly known as Staph (pronounced "staff"). Staph-related illness can range from mild and requiring no treatment to severe and potentially fatal.

The name Staphylococcus comes from the Greek staphyle, meaning a bunch of grapes, and kokkos, meaning berry, and that is what Staph bacteria look like under the microscope, like a bunch of grapes or little round berries. (In technical terms, these are gram-positive, facultative anaerobic, usually unencapsulated cocci.)

Over 30 different types of Staphylococci can infect humans, but most infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococci can be found normally in the nose and on the skin (and less commonly in other locations) of around 25%-30% of healthy adults and in 25% of hospital workers. In the majority of cases, the bacteria do not cause disease. However, damage to the skin or other injury may allow the bacteria to overcome the natural protective mechanisms of the body, leading to infection.

Picture of a Staph infection
What does a Staph infection look like?
Return to Staph Infection (Staphylococcus Aureus)

See what others are saying

Comment from: Mark L, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: September 09

I was turning 50 in July of 2013 but in March 2013 I was in hospital a week before I was diagnosed with MRSA. Apparently I had suffered 10 weeks with it before I nearly was unable to walk, and the family doctor was not able to work out what was wrong. Roughly 13 to 15cm long taking up 50 percent of my spinal column was the abscess and a 13 to 15cm diameter round internal mass outside of my spine between L3 to L4. I have an external 13 cm scar on my back, lost 3 weeks of memory whilst surviving the fever after the operation. I entered the hospital 84 kg and went down to 42 kg in the 2nd or 3rd week. I have shrunken discs where pressure is being put onto the nerves as I walk. I can only stand for 5 minutes at a time and walk a maximum of 400 meters before I collapse onto the ground in severe pain. I live on Tramadol 200 mg 2 a day and Codeine 30 mg 2 a day. If I need to go to a mall I'm limited to using a wheelchair. I had the operation near an old injury from the past but I picked up MRSA I suspect from sitting on a dirty toilet seat 8 or 10 years earlier when I had carbuncles on my buttocks. I exist now trying to find ways not to suffer pain so to all that healthy, feel fortunate.

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Comment from: coolboot, 19-24 Male (Patient) Published: November 17

I am an 84 year old male in relatively good health but suspected of prostate cancer. I tried bitter apricot seeds as preventive treatment. I chewed 4 seeds after dinner around 10 pm and retired at midnight. At 3 am I was startled awake with headache, abdominal pain, and acute nausea. Taste of bitter almonds was present in my mouth for a week after. I upchucked twice in an hour what appeared to be remains of the apricot seeds. My body was rejecting the seeds. I was unable to go back to sleep and spent the day in pain with headache, nausea and no appetite. I was unable to sleep next night, got dressed at 5 am and took cab to the emergency room where they ran a CT scan. They found a mass in my lower stomach, and I was told and they wanted to biopsy for cancer. I told them I had food poisoning, not cancer; cyanide in apricot seeds. They focused on cancer. For 3 days and nights I writhed in hospital bed with pain, nausea, headache, unable to sleep or eat. Sipping a little water was best I could do. They put me on a drip saline solution and pain reliever. By the time four days had elapsed, the pain had mostly subsided, and I could tell I was getting back to normal; that night they released me with no diagnosis but instructions to check in with primary care for outpatient follow up. I think I will never eat bitter apricot seeds again!

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