Heart Transplant - Indications

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Have you or a loved one received a heart transplant? What were the circumstances?

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Who needs a heart transplant?

There are not enough donor hearts available for everyone who may need a hear transplant. Therefore, there is a careful selection process in place to assure that hearts are distributed fairly and to those who will benefit most from the donor heart. The heart is just a pump, although a complicated pump. Most patients require a transplant because their hearts can no longer pump well enough to supply blood with oxygen and nutrients to the organs of the body. A smaller number of patients have a good pump, but a bad "electrical conduction system" of the heart. This electrical system determines the rate, rhythm and sequence of contraction of the heart muscle. There are all kinds of problems that can occur with the conduction system, including complete interruption of cardiac function causing sudden cardiac death.

While there are many people with "end-stage" heart disease with inadequate function of the heart, not all qualify for a heart transplant. All the other important organs in the body must be in pretty good shape. Transplants cannot be performed in patients with active infection, cancer, or bad diabetes mellitus; patients who smoke or abuse alcohol are also not good candidates. It's not easy to be a transplant recipient. These patients need to change their lifestyle and take numerous medications (commonly more than 30 different medications). Hence, all potential transplants patients must undergo psychological testing to identify social and behavioral factors that could interfere with recovery, compliance with medications, and lifestyle changes required after transplantation.

Moreover, needing a heart and being a suitable candidate are not enough. The potential donor heart must be compatible with the recipient's immune system to decrease the chance of problems with rejection. Finally, this precious resource, the donor organ, must be distributed fairly. The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) is in charge of a system that is in place to assure equitable allocation of organs to individuals who will benefit the most from transplantation. These are usually the sickest patients.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: 45-54 Female (Caregiver) Published: March 03

My sister had a heart transplant 3 days ago. It went very smooth, a 6 hour operation. She is 54 and had cardiomyopathy. An HVAD had been put in one year ago. She developed an infection due to the tubing in her abdomen. Today she was up and walking and feeling much better. She had been groggy up to this point. Things look good so far and we are hoping for a good result. It is expected she will be in the hospital 10 to 14 days.

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