Vertigo - Treatment

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What kind of treatment have you had for your vertigo? Did it help?

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What is the treatment for vertigo?

Some of the most effective treatments for peripheral vertigo include particle repositioning movements. The most well-known of these treatments is the Epley maneuver or canalith repositioning procedure. During this treatment, specific head movements lead to movement of the loose crystals (canaliths) within the inner ear. By repositioning these crystals, they cause less irritation to the inner ear and symptoms can resolve. Because these movements can initially lead to worsening of the vertigo, they should be done by an experienced health care professional or physical therapist.

Cawthorne head exercises, or vestibular rehabilitation habituation exercises, are a series of eye and head movements which lead to decreased sensitivity of the nerves within the inner ear and subsequent improvement of vertigo. These simple movements need to be practiced by the patient on a regular basis for best results.

Medications may provide some relief, but are not recommended for long-term use. Meclizine is often prescribed for persistent vertigo symptoms, and may be effective. Benzodiazepine medications like diazepam (Valium) are also effective but may cause significant drowsiness as a side effect. Other medications may be used to decrease nausea or vomiting. It is should be recognized that medications can provide symptomatic relief, but are not considered "cures" for vertigo.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: Mary, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: June 07

I have had vertigo on and off over a number of years. Sometimes it is so bad, I just can't move; I can only sit there and cry and moan. The one thing I have found that helps me is ear candling. You can buy small ear candles at the chemist and do it yourself. There are other large candles that ear candling professionals use. I did the one day course that allows me to buy the large ear candles. They work by gently extracting the wax in your ears and in the process, shift the irritation off your inner ear. It is the same theory as the maneuvers but much more gentle.

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Comment from: Shay_1, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: June 22

My torticollis journey started about 6 years ago. I didn't know what was going on with my neck. All I knew was that it wanted to turn and it was difficult to keep it straight. Well, this was also the beginning to an issue with anxiety. I was so anxious at work that this was happening, I left work and went straight to urgent care. I was given a prescription for Ativan. So now I am dealing with anxiety and neck pain. It took a little over a year to get correctly diagnosed but in that time I was given different pain/anxiety medications. I was also now dealing with depression as my activity level greatly decreased and I gained about 40 lb and basically just tried to get through my work day so I could go home to rest. I was correctly diagnosed when I was sent to the pain specialist to get a cortisone shot. I think it might have been maybe 10 minutes into the doctor visit and he said I don't need cortisone, I need Botox, and I finally had an answer. It was bittersweet but I was happy to finally get some relief from the pain. I started Botox injections and went every 3 months with relief until I couldn't afford it anymore. It has been about 1 1/2 years since my last injection. I'm feeling like I may need to go see the pain doctor soon as my neck is starting to feel tight and I've had some headaches. I can relate to a lot of you out there that are suffering from torticollis.

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