Sarcoidosis - Coping

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Living with sarcoidosis

The cause of sarcoidosis still remains unknown, so there is at present no known way to prevent or cure this disease. However, doctors have had a great deal of experience in management of the illness. It should be noted that most people with sarcoidosis lead normal lives.

If you have sarcoidosis, you can help yourself by following sensible health measures. You should not smoke. You should also avoid exposure to other substances such as dusts and chemicals that can harm your lungs.

Patients with sarcoidosis are best treated by a lung specialist or a doctor who has a special interest in sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis specialists are usually located at major research centers.

If you have any symptoms of sarcoidosis, see your doctor regularly so that the illness can be watched and, if necessary, treated. Regular checkups with the doctor are important even if there are no symptoms present. Eye examinations by an eye specialist can detect early eye inflammation from sarcoidosis.

Although severe sarcoidosis can reduce the chances of becoming pregnant, particularly for older women, many young women with sarcoidosis have given birth to healthy babies while on treatment. Patients planning to have a baby should discuss the matter with their doctor. Medical checkups all through pregnancy and immediately thereafter are especially important for sarcoidosis patients. In some cases, bed rest is necessary during the last three months of pregnancy. In addition to family and close friends, a number of local lung organizations, other nonprofit health organizations, and self-help groups are available to help patients cope with sarcoidosis. By keeping in touch with them, you can share personal feelings and experiences. Members also share specific information on the latest scientific advances, where to find a sarcoidosis specialist, and how to improve one's self-image.

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Comment from: moa, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: December 17

I now cope very well. I have been hospitalized 3 times and had extreme fatigue plus most other symptoms. My lung x-ray looked like spider webs. I suffer from sunstroke and shingles. I am a nurse and by good luck began working at exactly the place to help. Chelation therapy cleared excess calcium from lungs, tendons and muscle. Inflammation process lays down calcium. It can be anywhere. Excessive exposure to sun increases vitamin D causing calcium shift. I take rest, avoid chemicals, I can live positively with it by taking vitamin C (5gms) omegas, magnesium, ashwaganda, liver support, chromium and multivitamins.

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