Cirrhosis of The Liver - Experience

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Cirrhosis facts

  • Cirrhosis is a complication of liver disease which involves loss of liver cells and irreversible scarring of the liver.
  • Alcohol and viral hepatitis B and C are common causes of cirrhosis, although there are many other causes.
  • Cirrhosis can cause weakness, loss of appetite, easy bruising, yellowing of the skin (jaundice), itching, and fatigue.
  • Diagnosis of cirrhosis can be suggested by history, physical examination and blood tests, and can be confirmed by liver biopsy.
  • Complications of cirrhosis include edema and ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, bleeding from varices, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, hypersplenism, and liver cancer.
  • Treatment of cirrhosis is designed to prevent further damage to the liver, treat complications of cirrhosis, and preventing or detecting liver cancer early.
  • Transplantation of the liver is becoming an important option for treating patients with advanced cirrhosis.
Return to Cirrhosis (Liver)

See what others are saying

Comment from: judygarland, 55-64 Male (Caregiver) Published: November 25

My husband was diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) about 8 years ago. Up until about 9 months ago, his condition was stable, taking ursodiol which seemed to help. However, he did not want to have a transplant when he was first diagnosed, thinking the cirrhosis would not progress. He also was unable to accept the dietary limitations for his PBC and also for his type 2 diabetes. He rewarded himself with Kentucky Fried Chicken at times. He also had a sweet tooth which was not very satisfied. Starting in early February, his abdomen became swollen and hard, but he ignored the symptoms and did not see a doctor. Unfortunately, when he finally did go for a medical workup, it was not possible for him to be put on a transplant list because a colonoscopy revealed a malignant tumor. He developed hepatic encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome. Toward the end, he was able to walk only with extreme difficulty and he was hospitalized several times, the last for two weeks in a local hospital. I hope that anyone who has received a diagnosis of cirrhosis, PBC or any other type, get regular medical checkups and realize that if your liver disease progresses, only a transplant will save your life. Don't ignore the signs and symptoms, you can't live without a liver.

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Comment from: Michwebmd, 55-64 Female (Caregiver) Published: December 01

My best friend has cirrhosis of the liver and never drank. It is fatty liver cirrhosis, as she always ate fattening foods, from cakes to cereals, etc. She was always overweight, but not way overweight, like 250 for a 5 foot 7 girl. However, now that she has cirrhosis, her life is miserable. Her legs have swollen up, a lot of edema, her spleen is now enlarged, and her abdomen is enlarged. She has been trying to eat healthy, but it may be too late. It seems very scary.

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