Hemorrhoids - Treatment

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How are hemorrhoids treated?

Regardless of the size or swelling of a hemorrhoid, no treatment is required if symptoms do not exist.

Prevention is perhaps the most effective treatment. Diet and adequate hydration are very important to maintain normal bowel movements. Hemorrhoid symptoms can occur with the passage of hard stool and constipation, as well as diarrhea and frequent bowel movements. For patients with constipation, high fiber diet, adequate hydration and stool softeners may be required. For those with too frequent bowel movements, antidiarrheal medications and diet adjustments may be required. These preventive measures decrease the amount of straining that is required to have a bowel movement, thus decreasing the pressure within the blood vessels to prevent swelling.

Once hemorrhoidal symptoms develop, a variety of treatment options exist, depending upon the situation and severity of the hemorrhoids.

Internal hemorrhoids are graded by the degree of prolapse below the pectinate line into the anal canal.

  • Grade 1: the internal hemorrhoid bulges into the canal but does not prolapse or fall completely into it. These may bleed.
  • Grade 2: the hemorrhoid protrudes past the anal verge with straining for a bowel movement or passage of flatus, but spontaneously return to their original internal position once the straining has subsided.
  • Grade 3: the hemorrhoid may protrude past the anal verge without any straining and requires the patient to push them inside manually.
  • Grade 4: the internal hemorrhoid always stays protruded or prolapsed and is at risk for thrombosis or strangulation should the anal muscles go into spasm.
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See what others are saying

Comment from: sinfulangel, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: February 04

I had three internal hemorrhoids and just had the last banding done on the third one and I tell you it's worth it but it is painful and it goes on for a good couple of months because you can only have it done once every two weeks so far so good.

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Comment from: cy, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: December 05

I had surgery for a hiatal hernia because it was causing my stomach to partially twist, which happens in only 5 percent of hiatal hernia cases. Its official name is a partial stomach volvulus which is extremely dangerous if it twists and gets stuck. I was very lucky that mine did not, but given enough time it would have. I had to wait 10 months for my surgery which was extremely stressful. After waking up from surgery I was in more pain then I have ever been in, but in time that went away and I am extremely happy I got it done.

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