Cervical Dysplasia - Experience

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What is cervical dysplasia?

Cervical dysplasia refers to the presence of precancerous changes of the cells that make up the surface of the cervix, the opening to the womb (uterus). The term dysplasia refers to the abnormal appearance of the cells when viewed under the microscope. The degree and extent of abnormality seen on a tissue sample biopsy was formerly referred to as mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia. In recent years, this nomenclature has been replaced by a newer system. These systems are based upon changes in the appearance of cells visualized when smears of individual cells (cytological changes) or tissue biopsies (histological changes) are reviewed under a microscope. Pap smears obtain samples of the surface cells to determine if they are normal or abnormal and do not provide a diagnosis, which can only be done by a tissue biopsy.

  1. Pap smears are described according to the degree of abnormality: ASCUS (atypical squamous cells of uncertain significance), LSIL (low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and HSIL (high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Cells from glandular rather than squamous epithelium may also be described.
  2. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is cervical dysplasia that is a pathological diagnosis based on a cervical biopsy or surgically removed cervix. This is indicated by CIN1 (mild), CIN2 (moderate), CIN III (severe). These are all precancer conditions.

These classification systems will be further discussed below.

Return to Cervical Dysplasia

See what others are saying

Comment from: ds77, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: May 06

I am a 50-year-old female. I contracted a mild-to-moderate case of cervical dysplasia when I was 23 years old. I had laser surgery. I got married and had three children. When I turned 36, it came back severe with CIN2. I had a LEEP procedure. When I turned 43, I developed severe bleeding and was diagnosed with HPV with the deadliest cancer-causing strain. A uterine ablation was performed but ultimately failed. My gynecologist prescribed additional testing and found tumors and fibroids. My radical hysterectomy came at the age of 46. I strongly recommend being an advocate for your health and wellness. I lost a friend at the age of 31 to cervical cancer because she could not find a doctor that would take a radical move to cure her. After, she passed, her oncologist also died. Seek treatment and second opinions; it just might save your life. I know first-hand, and I am grateful that I did. I am doing quite well.

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Comment from: Julia, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: May 21

I am 27 years old, and I have been diagnosed with severe dysplasia. I had been told before, during and after my pregnancy that there were a few abnormal cells on my cervix but nothing for me to be worried about. I then went two years without having a PAP smear (not having a doctor, and having a small child can keep your mind off of these things). I am going in tomorrow to have the cells lasered off, and I am terrified. They did the biopsy and told me that there would be no pain involved! Boy were they ever wrong!!! I hurt like crazy for the rest of the day. My husband seems to be entertaining the idea that I've cheated on him (which I have NOT) because this was caused by this HPV. I'm worried, embarrassed, and unsure as to the future possibility of having another child. I've read some of the other comments on here, about hysterectomies, and I know my mother had to have one, albeit for different reasons, but still. Wish me luck, and for Pete's sake, get your PAP smears done, on schedule!!!! Save yourself some of the emotional upheaval that some of us have had to go through.

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