Menstruation - Problems

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What kinds of problems do women have with their periods?

Women can have a range of problems with their periods, including pain, heavy bleeding, and skipped periods.

Amenorrhea

Amenorrhea (ay-men-uh-REE-uh) the lack of a menstrual period. This term is used to describe the absence of a period in:

  • Young women who haven't started menstruating by age 15
  • Women and girls who haven't had a period for 90 days, even if they haven't been menstruating for long

Causes can include:

  • Pregnancy
  • Breastfeeding
  • Extreme weight loss
  • Eating disorders
  • Excessive exercising
  • Stress
  • Serious medical conditions in need of treatment

As mentioned previously, when your menstrual cycles come regularly, this means that important parts of your body are working normally. In some cases, not having menstrual periods can mean that your ovaries have stopped producing normal amounts of estrogen. Missing these hormones can have important effects on your overall health. Hormonal problems, such as those caused by polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or serious problems with the reproductive organs, may be involved. It's important to talk to a doctor if you have this problem.

Dysmenorrhea

Dysmenorrhea (dis-men-uh-REE-uh) - painful periods, including severe cramps. Menstrual cramps in teens are caused by too much of a chemical called prostaglandin (pros-tuh-GLAN-duhn). Most teens with dysmenorrhea do not have a serious disease, even though the cramps can be severe. In older women, the pain is sometimes caused by a disease or condition such as uterine fibroids or endometriosis.

For some women, using a heating pad or taking a warm bath helps ease their cramps. Some over-the-counter pain medicines can also help with these symptoms. They include:

  • Ibuprofen (eye-byu-PROH-fuhn) (for instance, Advil, Motrin, Midol Cramp)
  • Ketoprofen (key-toh-PROH-fuhn) (for instance, Orudis KT)
  • Naproxen (nuh-PROK-suhn) (for instance, Aleve)

If these medicines don't relieve your pain or the pain interferes with work or school, you should see a doctor. Treatment depends on what's causing the problem and how severe it is.

Abnormal uterine bleeding

Abnormal uterine bleeding is vaginal bleeding that's different from normal menstrual periods. It includes:

  • Bleeding between periods
  • Bleeding after sex
  • Spotting anytime in the menstrual cycle
  • Bleeding heavier or for more days than normal
  • Bleeding after menopause

Abnormal bleeding can have many causes. Your doctor may start by checking for problems that are most common in your age group. Some of them are not serious and are easy to treat. Others can be more serious. Treatment for abnormal bleeding depends on the cause.

In both teens and women nearing menopause, hormonal changes can cause long periods along with irregular cycles. Even if the cause is hormonal changes, you may be able to get treatment. You should keep in mind that these changes can occur with other serious health problems, such as uterine fibroids, polyps, or even cancer. See your doctor if you have any abnormal bleeding.

Return to Menstruation

See what others are saying

Comment from: Shane, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: March 06

After my menstruation, I always vomit, I don't know what's the reason.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: roguepixi3, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: February 26

My period abruptly went away last month when I ran a 15km marathon. The same day it started it just stopped bleeding. I started using oral contraceptive pill the beginning of February. This month there was a very dark red/black lining that exited my body. I"m assuming that was last month's endometrial lining. This is the time period I should be menstruating, but I am not.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

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