Broken Toe - Describe Your Experience

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Broken toe facts

  • Broken toes are often caused by trauma or injury. Prolonged repetitive movements can cause a type of broken toe called a stress or hairline fracture.
  • Symptoms of a broken toe include
    • pain,
    • swelling,
    • stiffness,
    • bruising,
    • deformity, and
    • difficultly walking.
  • Possible complications of a broken toe include
    • nail injury,
    • compound fracture,
    • infection,
    • deformity, or
    • arthritis.
  • Seek immediate medical care if you suspect an open fracture of the toe; if there is bleeding; cold, numb, or tingling sensation; if the toe appears deformed or is pointing in the wrong direction; or blue or gray color to the injured area.
  • A broken toe is diagnosed with a medical examination, which may include X-rays.
  • To help decrease pain and swelling in a broken toe, elevate the foot, ice the injury, and stay off the foot.
  • Depending on the severity of the fracture, the toe may need to be put back into place (reduced), and some compound toe fractures may require surgery.
  • Pain from a broken toe can usually be controlled with over-the-counter pain medication.
  • Buddy taping (taping the toe to an adjacent toe can be used to splint a fractured toe.
  • Most broken toes heal without complications in six weeks.
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See what others are saying

Comment from: Starmystik, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: August 05

My horse slipped in the mud going around a corner; her feel slid sideways out from under her and we both went down. I think she might have stepped on my foot when she scrambled back up (it happened so fast) but I ended up with a broken toe!

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Comment from: mebunches2001, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: September 01

I fractured my great toe in two places when I passed out and fell. The podiatrist taped it (x-rays were taken 10 days earlier at the emergency room). When I went back two weeks later to have it looked at, the podiatrist took his own x-rays and said the toe was dislocated and 'fixed' it by pulling on it, then put a cast on. At the next appointment he removed the cast and deemed it all to be healed. There were/are more issues but this was enough concerning just the toe.

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