Group B Strep - Describe Your Experience

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What is group B strep?

Group B strep (GBS) is a gram-positive streptococcal bacteria also known as Streptococcus agalactiae. This type of bacteria (not to be confused with group A strep which causes "strep throat") is commonly found in the human body, and it usually does not cause any symptoms. However, in certain cases, it can be a dangerous cause of various infections that can affect nonpregnant adults, pregnant women, and their newborn infants. Group B strep infection is the most common cause of sepsis and meningitis in the United States during a newborn's first week of life.

Group B strep infection can also afflict adults with certain chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Although the incidence of neonatal group B strep infection has been decreasing, the incidence of group B strep infection in nonpregnant adults appears to be increasing.

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Comment from: GroupBSurvivor91, 19-24 Female (Patient) Published: March 06

I was born May 25th 1991 with group B streptococcus. Within the first week that I was born I was rushed back to the hospital where my doctor told my parents that I had the infection. I was immediately taken from them where I was then hooked up to many machines as well as hooked up to a heart monitor and seizure monitor. My parents told me that I am very lucky to be alive. I stayed in the hospital for two weeks fighting the infection not even a month old. Both of my parents remind me every day about how fortunate I am to be here, and I believe I am as well. With all of the medication I took I'm really lucky to be here. I am now 22 with a son of my own who was not born with the infection and I am so grateful for that.

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Comment from: Ladyb, 35-44 Female (Caregiver) Published: March 18

Unknown to me I carried strep B. I had fever during labor, my hind waters had broken 22 hours previously and so my son was infected. The nurse said to me "why didn"t you tell us you had Strep B"? I had no idea what she was talking about and when I questioned it during our month long stay I was fobbed off. So second time around I told them what happened and they gave me antibiotic during labor, my second son only contracted surface strep so with a week of antibiotics he was ok. But the past three years I have suffered with hives, starting at the ankle and going up the body, dry scaly skin patch rashes to my legs, joint pain, weakness to muscles and tendon injuries, allergy increase, hair loss, breathing difficulties, brittle nails, clicking joints, one after the other sinus and urine infections, verrucas and skin tags, bloating, and burning knees. And it's just this week after much research into each of the above I learned that they can all be linked back to Strep B or A. I called the doctors and asked them to check my blood for it. I also had an extremely low vitamin D level of 7 and very low foliates which I rectified but a month after, it returned to the above state, including anaphylaxis. I am so onto this on Monday and will keep you posted.

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