Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease - Treatment

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How is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease treated?

There is no cure for CMT, but physical therapy, occupational therapy, braces and other orthopedic devices, and even orthopedic surgery can help individuals cope with the disabling symptoms of the disease. In addition, pain-killing drugs can be prescribed for individuals who have severe pain.

Physical and occupational therapy, the preferred treatment for CMT, involves muscle strength training, muscle and ligament stretching, stamina training, and moderate aerobic exercise. Most therapists recommend a specialized treatment program designed with the approval of the person's physician to fit individual abilities and needs. Therapists also suggest entering into a treatment program early; muscle strengthening may delay or reduce muscle atrophy, so strength training is most useful if it begins before nerve degeneration and muscle weakness progress to the point of disability.

Stretching may prevent or reduce joint deformities that result from uneven muscle pull on bones. Exercises to help build stamina or increase endurance will help prevent the fatigue that results from performing everyday activities that require strength and mobility. Moderate aerobic activity can help to maintain cardiovascular fitness and overall health. Most therapists recommend low-impact or no-impact exercises, such as biking or swimming, rather than activities such as walking or jogging, which may put stress on fragile muscles and joints.

Many CMT patients require ankle braces and other orthopedic devices to maintain everyday mobility and prevent injury. Ankle braces can help prevent ankle sprains by providing support and stability during activities such as walking or climbing stairs. High-top shoes or boots can also provide support for weak ankles. Thumb splints can help with hand weakness and loss of fine motor skills. Assistive devices should be used before disability sets in because the devices may prevent muscle strain and reduce muscle weakening. Some individuals with CMT may decide to have orthopedic surgery to reverse foot and joint deformities.

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See what others are saying

Comment from: Crystal, 7-12 Male (Caregiver) Published: October 28

I am a mother of 4. My 9 year old Troy was diagnosed with CMT (Charcot-Marie-Tooth) 6 months ago. He walks on his tip toes and has stabbing pains in his feet. He already has nerve damage in his hand and legs. He has to wear leg braces at night to stretch his muscles and every year he has to get casted for a mold to wear on his legs.

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Comment from: Nicho48, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: April 01

I have had Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease all my life. I have had surgery on my feet, claw toes triple arthrodesis at age 25. No one picked up on CMT despite the limp and foot drop, not until I was 50. I have been a chef all my working life, worst feet for worst job, fortunately my CMT is slow moving but am noticing effects at 65.

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