Pain Relief Options for Childbirth - Epidurals and Spinals

Please describe your experience with either an epidural or spinal anesthesia.

Share your story with others:

MedicineNet appreciates your comment. Your comment may be displayed on the site and will always be published anonymously.Patient Comments FAQs

Enter your Comment

Tell us a bit about your background to make your comments more useful to other MedicineNet users. (Optional)

Screen Name: *

Gender of Patient: Male Female

Age Range of Patient:

I am a: Patient Caregiver


* Screen Name will appear next to the published comment. Please do not include your full name or email address.

By submitting your comment, and other materials (collectively referred to as a "Submission") to MedicineNet, you grant MedicineNet permission to use, copy, transmit, publish, display, edit and modify your Submission in connection with its Web site. MedicineNet will not pay you for your Submission. You represent that you have all rights necessary for MedicineNet to use your Submission as set forth above.

Please keep these guidelines in mind when writing your comment:

  • Please make sure you address the question asked.
  • Due to the overwhelming number of comments received, not all comments will be published.
  • When selecting comments to publish, our staff will choose those that are educational and complement the topic. Please try to stay on topic.
  • Your comment may be edited. We would typically edit comments to make them clearer and more readable. We will remove personal information such as last names, email and web addresses, and other potentially harmful information.
  • We will not notify you if your comment has been published. We suggest that you check back on the topic article regularly.
  • We do not provide medical or healthcare advice, treatment, or diagnosis.

Thank you for participating!


I have read and agree to abide by the MedicineNet Terms and Conditions and the MedicineNet Privacy Policy (required).

To prevent our systems from spam, please complete the following prior to submitting your comment.

Please select the black square:

Regional anesthesia: Spinal and epidural blocks

Spinal and epidural anesthesia are popular choices for pain control because they do not affect your ability to push during labor. In both of these procedures, medications are injected near the nerves of the low back to block pain signals from your lower body, even though you remain awake and labor is usually not significantly slowed. An anesthesiologist typically administers this type of anesthesia. A spinal block involves injection of the medication right around the spinal nerves, while in an epidural block the medicine is injected into the sac that surrounds the spinal cord. Before the medications are injected, a numbing medication is given in the low back. Both these options can also be used for a Cesarean delivery.

Because many women are not able to urinate and others are affected by anesthesia, you may require a urinary catheter with spinal or epidural anesthesia. An uncommon complication is experiencing a headache after the anesthesia wears off. Both types of anesthesia may reduce your blood pressure somewhat, although this is more common with a spinal block.

A spinal block requires less medication and is typically given one time, while a catheter may be inserted into the epidural space for repeated delivery of anesthetic medications.

An epidural block takes about 10 to 20 minutes to work, and because a catheter is inserted into the epidural space, the effects can last as long as needed due to the ability to inject more medication. A spinal block begins working immediately, but its effects last only about 2 hours. It is possible to have a combination of spinal and epidural anesthesia.

Return to Pain Relief Options for Childbirth

Stay Informed!

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox FREE!