Actinic Keratosis - Describe Your Experience

Not ready to share? Read other Patient Comments

Please describe your experience with actinic keratosis.

Share your story with others:

MedicineNet appreciates your comment. Your comment may be displayed on the site and will always be published anonymously.Patient Comments FAQs

Enter your Comment

Tell us a bit about your background to make your comments more useful to other MedicineNet users. (Optional)

Screen Name: *

Gender of Patient: Male Female

Age Range of Patient:

I am a: Patient Caregiver


* Screen Name will appear next to the published comment. Please do not include your full name or email address.

By submitting your comment, and other materials (collectively referred to as a "Submission") to MedicineNet, you grant MedicineNet permission to use, copy, transmit, publish, display, edit and modify your Submission in connection with its Web site. MedicineNet will not pay you for your Submission. You represent that you have all rights necessary for MedicineNet to use your Submission as set forth above.

Please keep these guidelines in mind when writing your comment:

  • Please make sure you address the question asked.
  • Due to the overwhelming number of comments received, not all comments will be published.
  • When selecting comments to publish, our staff will choose those that are educational and complement the topic. Please try to stay on topic.
  • Your comment may be edited. We would typically edit comments to make them clearer and more readable. We will remove personal information such as last names, email and web addresses, and other potentially harmful information.
  • We will not notify you if your comment has been published. We suggest that you check back on the topic article regularly.
  • We do not provide medical or healthcare advice, treatment, or diagnosis.

Thank you for participating!


I have read and agree to abide by the MedicineNet Terms and Conditions and the MedicineNet Privacy Policy (required).

To prevent our systems from spam, please complete the following prior to submitting your comment.

Please select the black square:

What is an actinic keratosis, and what does it look like?

An actinic keratosis (AK), also known as a solar keratosis, is a small, rough spot occurring on skin that has been chronically exposed to the sun. Actinic keratoses generally measure in size between 2-6 millimeters in diameter (between the size of a pencil point and that of an eraser). They are usually reddish in color, with a rough texture and often have a white or yellowish scale on top. Actinic keratosis often occurs against a background of sun damage, including sallowness, wrinkles, and superficial blood vessels.

In addition to feeling rough, actinic keratoses may feel sore or painful when fingers or clothing rub against them.

Specialized forms of actinic keratoses include cutaneous horns, in which the skin protrudes in a thick, hornlike manner, and actinic cheilitis, which refers to scaling and roughness of the lower lip and blurring of the border of the lip and adjacent skin.

Return to Actinic Keratosis

See what others are saying

Comment from: Mary, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: April 22

I spent many hot summers outside in Maryland as a child and never used any protection on my skin. Now that I am in my fifties I had an actinic keratosis on the center of my nose. I had it removed by my dermatologist and she told me to always put sunblock on my skin even when it is cloudy outside.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: GlynnFromOklahoma, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: April 23

I have never ever been a person to get in the sun since I was a child. I have never had a bad sunburn. I am, however, very fair skinned and in the last 3 decades have had keratoacanthoma, squamous cell cancer, and now inflamed actinic keratoses. It"s a mystery to me how someone who takes extraordinary measures to keep out of the sun still continues to get these lesions of varying degrees. My father had an awful keratoacanthoma of his ear that required removing the entire top of his ear. But he was a farmer. He later died of lung cancer. I am not sure there is a connection but it certainly bears being vigilant about your skin and bringing new lesions to the attention of your medical provider.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

STAY INFORMED

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!