Eye Allergies - Personal Experience

Not ready to share? Read other Patient Comments

Please describe your experience with eye allergies.

Share your story with others:

MedicineNet appreciates your comment. Your comment may be displayed on the site and will always be published anonymously.Patient Comments FAQs

Enter your Comment

Tell us a bit about your background to make your comments more useful to other MedicineNet users. (Optional)

Screen Name: *

Gender of Patient: Male Female

Age Range of Patient:

I am a: Patient Caregiver


* Screen Name will appear next to the published comment. Please do not include your full name or email address.

By submitting your comment, and other materials (collectively referred to as a "Submission") to MedicineNet, you grant MedicineNet permission to use, copy, transmit, publish, display, edit and modify your Submission in connection with its Web site. MedicineNet will not pay you for your Submission. You represent that you have all rights necessary for MedicineNet to use your Submission as set forth above.

Please keep these guidelines in mind when writing your comment:

  • Please make sure you address the question asked.
  • Due to the overwhelming number of comments received, not all comments will be published.
  • When selecting comments to publish, our staff will choose those that are educational and complement the topic. Please try to stay on topic.
  • Your comment may be edited. We would typically edit comments to make them clearer and more readable. We will remove personal information such as last names, email and web addresses, and other potentially harmful information.
  • We will not notify you if your comment has been published. We suggest that you check back on the topic article regularly.
  • We do not provide medical or healthcare advice, treatment, or diagnosis.

Thank you for participating!


I have read and agree to abide by the MedicineNet Terms and Conditions and the MedicineNet Privacy Policy (required).

To prevent our systems from spam, please complete the following prior to submitting your comment.

Please select the black square:

What are allergic eye conditions?

Allergic conjunctivitis

Allergic conjunctivitis, also called "allergic rhinoconjunctivitis," is the most common allergic eye disorder. The condition is usually seasonal and is associated with hay fever. The main cause is pollens, although indoor allergens such as dust mites, molds, and dander from household pets such as cats and dogs may affect the eyes year-round. Typical complaints include itching, redness, tearing, burning, watery discharge, and eyelid swelling. To a large degree, the acute (initial) symptoms appear related to histamine release.

The treatments of choice are topical antihistamine drops such as olopatadine (Patanol), decongestants, and the newer mast-cell stabilizer medications. Topical steroids should be used only if prescribed by a doctor for severe reactions and on a short-term basis because of the potential for side effects. In general, oral antihistamines like loratadine (Claritin) or cetirizine (Zyrtec) are the least effective option, but they are often used for treating allergic rhinitis together with allergic conjunctivitis.

Allergy assist

Rubbing itchy eyes is a natural response. However, rubbing usually worsens the allergic reaction due to the physical impact on the mast cells, which causes them to release more mediators of the immune response. Translation: Do not rub your eyes!

Conjunctivitis with atopic dermatitis

Commonly called "atopic keratoconjunctivitis," this condition is a notorious cause of severe eye changes, particularly in young adults. Atopic keratoconjunctivitis implies inflammation of both the conjunctiva and cornea. "Kerato" means pertaining to the cornea. This form of conjunctivitis usually affects males 3 times more frequently than females and may begin in late adolescence. It's peak incidence is in males aged 30 to 50. It is more common in those who had atopic dermatitis in early childhood. The condition is characterized by intensely itchy, red areas that appear on the eyelids. A heavy discharge from the eyes can occur, and the skin of the eyelid may show scales and crusts. In severe cases, the eyes become sensitive to light, and the eyelids noticeably thicken. If managed poorly, there can be permanent scarring of the cornea due to chronic rubbing and scratching of the eyes. This scarring can cause visual changes.

The triggers for atopic keratoconjunctivitis appear to be similar to those of atopic dermatitis. A search for common food allergies, such as eggs, peanuts, milk, soy, wheat, or fish is important. Airborne allergens, particularly dust mites and pet dander, have been overlooked as a significant contributing factor and should be evaluated and controlled.

The hallmark of treatment for allergic conjunctivitis is the use of potent antihistamines (similar to those used in atopic dermatitis) to subdue the itching. Topical antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, and the short-term use of oral steroids are all beneficial for relief of the itching. Occasionally, an infection of the area (usually with staphylococcus, commonly referred to as "staph") worsens the symptoms, and antibiotic treatment may help control the itching. Allergy shots are useful in selected cases.

Allergy alert

Atopic keratoconjunctivitis can lead to cataract formation in up to 10% of cases. In rare cases, blindness can occur.

Vernal keratoconjunctivitis

Vernal keratoconjunctivitis is an uncommon condition that tends to occur in preadolescent boys (3:1 male to female ratio) and is usually outgrown during the late teens or early adulthood. (Vernal is another term for "spring.") Vernal keratoconjunctivitis usually appears in the late spring and particularly occurs in rural areas where dry, dusty, windy, and warm conditions prevail. The eyes become intensely itchy, sensitive to light, and the lids feel uncomfortable and droopy. The eyes produce a "stringy" discharge and, when examined, the surface under the upper eyelids appears "cobblestoned." A closer examination of the eye reveals severe inflammation due to the vast number of mast cells and accumulated eosinophils (a type of white blood cell involved in the allergic response), producing so-called called "Trantas dots."

Improper treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis can lead to permanent visual impairment. The most effective treatment appears to be a short-term course of low-dose topical steroids. Topical mast-cell stabilizers and topical antihistamines can also be beneficial. Wraparound sunglasses are helpful to protect the eyes against wind and dust.

Allergy fact

Keratitis, or the inflammation of the cornea, in vernal and atopic keratoconjunctivitis is largely caused by a substance that is released from the eosinophils called major basic protein.

Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC)

This condition is named for its typical feature, large papillae, or bumps, on the conjunctiva under the upper eyelid. These bumps are likely the result of irritation from a foreign substance, such as contact lenses. Hard, soft, and rigid gas-permeable lenses are all associated with the condition. The reaction is possibly linked to the protein buildup on the contact lens surface. This condition is believed, in part, to be due to an allergic reaction to either the contact lens itself, protein deposits on the contact lens, or the preservative in the solution for the contact lenses. Redness and itching of the eye develop, along with a thick discharge.

Allergy to contact lenses is most common among wearers of hard contact lenses and is least common among those who use disposable lenses, especially the one-day or one-week types. Sleeping with the contact lenses on greatly increases the risk of developing GPC.

The most effective treatment is to stop wearing the contact lenses. Occasionally, changing the type of lens in addition to more frequent cleaning or using disposable daily wear lenses will prevent the condition from recurring.

The giant papillae on the conjunctiva, which are characteristic of GPC, however, may persist for months despite these measures. Eye medications, such as cromolyn (Opticrom) or lodoxamide (Alomide), often are used in this condition, sometimes for several months. Contact lenses should not be worn while these medications are being used.

Return to Eye Allergy

See what others are saying

Comment from: Anne, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: October 31

I used face paints and eye makeup and today I can't open my eyes. They are sore and stingy and running so I must have an allergic reaction.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: jubusad, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: February 12

My eyelids itch terribly and my eyes water constantly, only when the weather is warm and mostly in the spring. Tears will stream down at times. I have been tested for allergies and nothing showed up. This has been going on most of my life, but seems to be worse as I get older.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

Stay Informed!

Get the latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox FREE!